Collection

Whitney Western Art Museum

Medium

oil with sand -
oil 13 -

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Object name: Untitled

Accession Number: 5.99

Date : 1948

Gloss: Jackson's early success as an artist came in the post World War II period when he settled in New York and painted in an abstract style. He embraced the modernist vocabulary in art. This painting shows the influence of Cubism in the way that Jackson breaks up forms and uses space in a non-linear way. Although he received recognition as an Abstract Expressionist artist, Jackson later chose to leave New York for Wyoming and to return to portraying the human figure.

Dimensions: H: 21.063 in, width: 25.938 in, Frame height: 25.5 in, Frame width: 29.5 in

Credit Line: Gift of Anonymous Donor

Inscription: label on verso of frame: Barrison Art Galleries/ Fine Arts/ 1713 Chestnut Street/ Philadelphia, 3 Pa. [stamped on stretcher:] 25 THE/ LITTLE GALLERY/ EAST NEWARK, NJ [pencil inscripition on stretcher:] Harry A Shapiro/ Chatham CT E AJ/ 49 (superscript) th Locust AL4 5702 (illegible pencil inscription) Harry/ A Shapiro 5177 [center, left stretcher bar, partially obliterated by canvas) LITTLE GALLERY/ EAST NEWARK, NJ [written, right stretcher bar:] 5087

Synopsis: Painting- Untitled- Jackson, Harry- oil- canvas- oil with sand- chair- plate- abstract- label on verso of frame: Barrison Art Galleries/ Fine Arts/ 1713 Chestnut Street/ Philadelphia, 3 Pa. [stamped on stretcher:] 25 THE/ LITTLE GALLERY/ EAST NEWARK, NJ [pencil inscripition on stretcher:] Harry A Shapiro/ Chatham CT E AJ/ 49 (superscript) th Locust AL4 5702 (illegible pencil inscription) Harry/ A Shapiro 5177 [center, left stretcher bar, partially obliterated by canvas) LITTLE GALLERY/ EAST NEWARK, NJ [written, right stretcher bar:] 5087- LL: Jackson 48

Record Completeness

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Virtual Galleries

Works by Harry Jackson
Works by Harry Jackson - Curated by Nancy McClure


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