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Accession Number: NA.702.5

Date : early 1900s

Dimensions: L: 36.625 in, width: 60.625 in

Remarks: Communication and Media of Exchange: Writing and Records. Painted and drawn on muslin in brown, black and red. Count starts at 1800-1801 and ends at 1870 - 1871. 70 small paragraphs. Copy of Lone Dog's winter count.

Inscription: Property of the Missionary Education Movement, stamped on back, lower right

Synopsis: winter count- Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana- Sioux- paint- muslin- Property of the Missionary Education Movement, stamped on back, lower right- Communication and Media of Exchange: Writing and Records. Painted and drawn on muslin in brown, black and red. Count starts at 1800-1801 and ends at 1870 - 1871. 70 small paragraphs. Copy of Lone Dog's winter count.

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Winter Count NA.702.5 Made by the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the early 1900s. This winter count is made from a buffalo hide. It was used for communication and media exchange. The count recalls major events for ever year starting with the date 1800-1801 through 1870-1871.

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