Hunting Tools

Listed below are 10 items used by the Plains Indians for hunting purposes. All of which have their own significant value and purpose as a tool. It allowed the Native Americans to harvest big game animals like the buffalo and successfully put food on the table for the tribes. Over time hunting got much safer and easier when rifles and saddles came into their world.
Curated by Jami Hicks

Begin tour »


This gallery has 10 objects

Made from wood, plant fibers, dyed porcupine quills, tanned hide, and dyed feathers From the Plains Indians From the Plains Indians usually used a higher poundage bow for war and a low poundage weight. These were used for training arrows for young Indian bows for hunting.
View record »


Made from a agate or stone and chipped away to sharpen the edges for easier penetration. Also used for knifes and other sharp tools
View record »


Gathered sinew from the back, lets, gut, and rawhide of different animals
View record »


Allowed the Native Americans to travel horseback hands free with out having to hold on the bow and arrows 24/7. From the Crow tribe
View record »


single piece of wood with wrapped sinew ends and tanned hide for the handle From the Plains Indians usually used a higher poundage bow for war and a low poundage weight for hunting
View record »


made from tanned hide Came from the Sioux and Northern Plains Indians
View record »


Used as a predator mask to get the buffalo to stampede Also used coyote hides North Plains Indians
View record »


Made from a carved antler with a plain steel blade. Used for skinning and other hunting purposes North Plains Indians
View record »


Women's saddle, used without a rigging, made from wood and wrapped with buffalo rawhide Used animal hides for saddle blankets Saddles and saddle blanks became a showpiece each having their own decorative techniques.
View record »


Got rifles from the Government for hunting purposes, capturing them from wars, and trading. Made it hunting a lot safer and more ethical.
View record »


Questions and Comments