Culture through Clothing

The goal of this exhibit is to look at various types of clothing from different tribes. In this exhibit, you will see clothes ranging from basic shirts to clothing used for religious activities. My goal was to organize the objects in a way that was cyclical, by starting with a traditional headdress used for adornment or ceremonial purposes and ending with a hat that is also used for adornment or ceremonial purposes. Two different things being used in similar ways. Moreover, the recurring theme, is practical attire with cultural pride right in the fabric.
Curated by AaronD

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This gallery has 10 objects

A headdress made of different feathers, yarn, and beads, this bonnet was typically used as an adornment and as a symbol of status.
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A bracelet formed on a loom, this would be worn for rituals or on a daily basis.
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A gift from J. C. "Kid Nichols" this Ghost Dance dress with intricate designs gives us an example of how the clothes were just as much a part of the ceremony as the dances themselves.
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Another Gift, this one from the Searle Family Trust and the Paul Stock Foundation this artifact is for the Ghost dance also. Showing that different adornments are used for the same ceremony.
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Gifted from The New Hampshire Historical Society, this shirt was used for both daily uses and religious purposes. The fact that that this shirt was used for multiple circumstances shows a versatility in clothing then just as we do now.
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A beautiful shirt donated by the Dyck and Nielson families as well as the Estate of Margaret S. Coe, this piece shows us the functionality of the Native Americans' clothes. An everyday-use shirt, the only real damage is a few broken quills.
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A gift from Larry Sheerin this shirt was also used for every day and or festival use.
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From Harriet and Edson Spencer, these doll- moccasins are an example of how, even in the past, dressing toys like we dress ourselves is a cultural norm. This item links not only time periods, but different cultures.
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As this toy cradle is able to be worn, like an accessory or out of necessity, it can be viewed as a type of clothing. Gifted by Richard W. Leche this toy cradle, like other artifacts before it, show a blending of cultures. Just like Native American children would play with this cradle, kids today have mock strollers. However the craftsmanship illustrates the pride put into creating toys.
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Perhaps one of the most well-known artifacts at the Buffalo Bill Museum, this flat-bill cap brings the exhibit to a full circle. Much like it headdress ancestor, this hat can be worn at festivities, but as it is also a more modern item it can be worn for everyday use. This hat symbolizes one way to adopt more modern looks, while keeping the culture and craftsmanship of the Native Americans alive and well.
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