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1988.8.373
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.373 | 1924-1932 | L: 41 in, Barrel length: 20.875 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The older Winchester Model 1894 lever action was furnished in a great variety of styles, types and lengths of barrels, magazine capacities, etc. in both solid frame and takedown. By 1924, however, the sale of many of the variations had gradually dropped to a point so low that it was no longer profitable to continue their manufacture. It was decided to discontinue all of the variations in the Model 1894 rifle line and continue the manufacture of the rifle in only one standard type. The design was modernized in both solid frame and takdown style, and placed on the market as the Winchester Model 55. The principal changes incorporated in the new model included a 24-inch round barrel, shotgun type buttstock with a checkered steel buttplate, and a change in sight equipment. Although the Model 55 was in some respects a more modern rifle than its predecessor, it did not enjoy large sales; about 20,580 were made. It was revamped and reissued later as the Model 64 (Watrous: 1966). | Needs inscription. There is no written record for this firearm. | 1988.8.373v2.jpg | 1988.8.373v1.jpg | lever action | firearm | rifle | straight grip | tubular | stock | sporting | magazine | barrel | walnut | hammer | repeating | round barrel | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.197
American | Winchester Repeat...
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1988.8.197 | ca. 1877 | L: 52.5 in, Barrel length: 31.5 in, H: 8 in | The Hotchkiss magazine rifle was invented by Benjamin Hotchkiss, an American living in Paris, France. In 1877, Winchester bought the rights to manufacture and sell the arm in hopes of obtaining government contracts. This was the first bolt action, repeating rifle produced by Winchester and it used a tubular magazine in the buttstock. Three styles of Hotchkiss were produced between 1879 and 1899, nearly all were in the military "musket" style. This experimental/prototype is a First Model Hotchkiss rifle, 1879-1880. | Hotchkiss-Berdan Musket | .50 | none | 1988.8.197.JPG | firearm | magazine | tubular | experimental/variant bolt and bolt handle | round barrel | barrel | berdan pattern | hotchkiss | experimental | prototype | musket | military | American | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

NA.202.86
dress yoke | tin | tubular |...
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NA.202.86 | ca. 1905 | L: 14 in, width: 28.5 in | Gift of Max Wilde | Dress and Adornment: Daily And/Or Festive Adornment. Tanned, deer hide, beige cloth yoke with blue cloth trim. Fully beaded in geometric design with glass tube beads, tin cones, bead and rawhide fringe along sleeve edges. | NA.202.86.JPG | na.202.86.jpg | geometric | dress yoke | tin | tubular | blue | trade | hide | rawhide | cloth | cones | fringe | beige | deer | Beads | tanned | glass

1988.8.123
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.123 | 1929 | L: 49.125 in, Barrel length: 28.75 in, H: 8.5 in | bottom of barrel/571014/PL barrel/MADE IN U.S.A./-STAINLESS STEEL-WINCHESTER-MODEL 12- 12 GA./TRADE MARK FULL./PL receiver/MADE IN U.S.A. WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. NEW HAVEN. CONN. PAT. JULY 21. 1896./FEB. 22. JUNE 14. 1898. SEPT. 7 1909. MAY 17. 24. 31. JUNE 7. 14. 28. JULY 5. 12. 1910. JULY 22. 1913./ | Winchester R & D label on Pl receiver. | 1988.8.123.JPG | shotgun, repeating | firearm | two-piece walnut | tubular | front sight | hammerless | checkered bakelite buttplate | barrel | bead | stock | finish | matted receiver top | pistol grip | magazine | round barrel | take down | grooved slide handle | slide bar and magazine band blued, remainder bright stainless steel | rear sight | single barrel | barrel, magazine and receiver entirely stainless steel | full | slide action | varnished | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.363
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.363 | 1932-1963 | L: 39 in, Barrel length: 21.375 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The Winchester Model 61 was developed as a modern, hammerless 22 caliber rim fire repeating rifle, incorporating all of the modern features of this type of arm. This model sold in reasonably satisfactory quantities, although handicapped to some extent by the much earlier introduction of the hammerless action by competitive manufacturers. About 342,001 were made (Watrous: 1966). This experimental slide action rifle was never adopted as the Model 61, due to the infringement of a Browning patent made in Belgium. | [left barrel] 22 short-long | or Long Rifle; [breech] (Winchester proof marks) | Needs inscription, condition, and dimensions. | 22 | not serially numbered | 1988.8.363v1.jpg | 1988.8.363v2.jpg | slide action | rifle | firearm | experimental | round barrel | tubular | sporting | rear sight | finish | stock | blued overall | blade/bead | varnished | two-piece walnut | adjustable v-notch | repeating | takedown | magazine | front sight | barrel | semi-pistol grip | forepiece ribbed | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.330
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.330 | ca. 1940 | L: 45.5 in, Barrel length: 26 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | Announcement of the new Winchester Model 42 hammerless slide action repeating shotgun was an innovation. It was the first shotgun with this type of action ever developed especially for the 410 gauge shell. Factory records show the first delivery of Model 42 shotguns to warehouse stock was made in May 1933. Although the Model 42 in design and appearance closely resembles the Winchester Model 12, it was not a copy of this model but was in all respects a small, lightweight shotgun developed especially for the 410 gauge. The M/42 was discontinued in 1963; about 159,353 were made (Watrous: 1966). The receiver and magazine of this Model 42 have been cut away with numerous windows on both sides to demonstrate the internal mechanisms. | [barrel left] Made in New Haven, Conn. U.S. of America | Winchester Proof Steel | Winchester/Trade Mark | Model 42 - 410 -3 in.cham. | Mod. | Breech (Winchester Proof stamps) | 2/24/03: A note that this firearm needs a condition report. Tubular magazine. Blued overall. Two piece walnut, oiled, grooved slide handle, pistol grip, checkered Bakelite buttplate with old style Winchester trade mark. Take down. Receiver and magazine cutaway with numberous windows on both sides to deomonstrate internal mechanisms. Single barrel. Bead front sight. Matted receiver top rear sight. | Model 42 | .410 | 77642 | 1988.8.330v1.jpg | 1988.8.330v1.jpg | 1988.8.330v2.jpg | 1988.8.330v2.jpg | firearm | single barrel | round barrel | two-piece walnut | rear sight | magazine | finish | tubular | grooved slide handle | blued overall | stock | modified | choke modified | pistol grip | oiled | bead | takedown | barrel | front sight | checkered bakelite buttplate | matted receiver top | shotgun | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT | American

1988.8.909
Remington Arms Co., Ilion, N...
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1988.8.909 | ca. 1880 | L: 5.875 in, Barrel length: 3.125 in, H: 3 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The magazine of this Remington-Rider pistol is loaded from the muzzle end. | [top of barrel:] E. REMINGTON & SONS. ILION. NY/RIDERS PAT. AUG. 15TH. 1871 [lower left side barrel:] W.R.A. CO. | 1988.8.909.jpg | metallic cartridge | pistol | firearm | stock | tubular | open | blade front | plain | magazine | octagon barrel | trigger | walnut grips | barrel | five-shot | sights | Remington Arms Co., Ilion, NY | American

1988.8.164
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.164 | ca. 1866 | L: 43.5 in, Barrel length: 23.375 in, H: 8.75 in | Magazine is unlocked by turning piece at forward end out of engagement with the barrel. When the spring lock at the rear end of the magazine is pushed inward, the magazine can be drawn forward, exposing the loading opening. | Ref Hall: 9562 on left side of upper tang; 9790 inside buttplate; 13,546 stamped on wooden stock in inletting for upper tang. | 1988.8.164v1.jpg | 1988.8.164v2.jpg | rifle | lever action | firearm | altered | brass | magazine | tubular | briggs patent | recess in buttstock for jointed cleaning rod | buttplate | receiver | experimental | repeating | henry | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.280
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.280 | ca. 1886 | L: 47 in, Barrel length: 27.375 in, H: 7.75 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The Model 1886 lever action repeating rifle was developed to handle powerful center fire cartridges. Based on a Browning patent (U.S. 306,577), with improvements by Winchester master designer William Mason, the Model 1886 incorporated strong vertical bolt locks and a very smooth action. Magazine capacity varied depending on magazine length and cartridge caliber (cartridges ranged from .33 W.C.F. to .50/110 Express). Receivers were casehardened until 1901, when blued finish became standard. This prototype incorporates Browning and Mason designs and is almost identical to the final production Model 1886. Minor differences include a receiver which is approximately 1/2-inch shorter, a more forward mounted hammer, slight difference in tang shape, circular opening in bolt top, and one extra screw and hole in left side of receiver. | NONE | Cataloged by BCD 4/91. Cartridge lifter does not work, and bolt does not push hammer to full cock. Old number W2038 is incorrect. | Model 1886 Prototype | .45 | 1988.8.280v2.jpg | 1988.8.280v1.jpg | firearm | stock | sporting | octagon barrel | finish | tubular | crescent buttplate | repeating | rear sight | blade | prototype | ladder | barrel | adjustable | two-piece walnut | front sight | magazine | in the white | Prototype Model 1886 Rifle Maker: Winchester Repeating Arms Co.; New Haven, CT Serial Number: None Caliber: .45 Date: ca. 1886 Catalogue Number: 1988.8.280 Gift of Olin Corporation Winchester Arms Collection The Model 1886 as finally manufactured incorporated designs developed by both John M. Browning and William Mason. | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT | American

1988.8.253
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.253 | ca. 1940 | L: 37.5 in, Barrel length: 19.25 in, H: 7.5 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | bottom receiver/1890__/ADS/front of trigger/HA/PL barrel/MADE IN NEW HAVEN, CONN. U.S. OF AMERICA-WINCHESTER-/MODEL 9-30-30 WIN.-/-WINCHESTER PROOF STEEL--TRADE MARK-/ | Winchester R & D label on PL stock. | No label on stock 02/23/2009. | Winchester Model 94 | .30-30 Winchester | 18960__ | 1988.8.253v2.jpg | 1988.8.253v1.jpg | firearm | adjustable semi-buckhorn (missing elevator) | barrel | finish | rear sight | two-piece walnut | stock | tubular | varnished | ramp/bead (hood missing) | lever action | repeating | blued overall | frame and stocking partially cutaway to demonstrate internal workings | magazine | round barrel | front sight | carbine, cutaway | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.366
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.366 | 1933-1958 | L: 36.25 in, Barrel length: 19.5 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | This model was a revamping of the first Winchester self-loading rifle, the Model 1903, which was chambered only for a rim fire caliber especially developed for it and known as the 22 Winchester Automatic cartridge. Later, due to the popularity of the 22 Long Rifle cartridge, there was a rather insistent customer demand that an additional chambering be furnished for the 22 Long Rifle cartridge. The Model 63 was automaatic (self-loading), with balanced breech bolt recoil operated mechanism. This means that the breech bolt contains a quantity of metal proportioned to the weight and velocity of the bullet so that the shock of the recoil is absorbed by the breech bolt, in a sense balancing the recoil. When the cartridge is fired, the bullet leaves the muzzle of the barrel before the breech bolt commences to move rearward. The design and weight of the breech bolt are proportioned so that there is no loss of velocity and energy of the bullet. With this self-loading type of mechanism, the trigger must be pulled and released for each shot. The Model 63 was discontinued in 1958. About 174,692 were made (Watrous: 1966). | Needs inscription and condition: Note 5.20.91 and 02.25.03. | 22 | 1988.8.366v1.jpg | 1988.8.366v2.jpg | automatic | rifle | firearm | round barrel | sporting | tubular | experimental | takedown | stock | repeating | magazine | walnut | barrel | hammerless | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.162
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.162 | ca. 1866 | L: 43 in, Barrel length: 23.125 in, H: 8.75 in | The all-brass forend slides forward to expose the operture. | Ref. Flayderman: serial number located on tang, inside. | 1988.8.162v1.jpg | 1988.8.162v2.jpg | lever action | rifle | firearm | front sight | henry | folding | experimental | receiver | rear sight | tubular | repeating | recess in buttstock for jointed cleaning rod | briggs patent | buttplate | made from us indian head cent | magazine | brass | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.267
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.267 | 1890 | L: 40.5 in, Barrel length: 23.625 in, H: 7.375 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The Model 1890 was the most popular repeating rifle, using rimfire cartridges for general, all around informal shooting purposes, ever made by Winchester. For many years it was also generally considered the universal firearm for use in shooting galleries. This developmental rifle displays many features not seen in later production models. | Winchester Model 1890 | sample | .22 | not serially numbered | 1988.8.267v1.jpg | 1988.8.267v2.jpg | 1988.8.267.jpg | 1988.8.267v2 (2).jpg | firearm | barrel | plain | finish | trigger | tubular | in the white | fine toolroom machine work | developmental | magazine | octagon barrel | repeating | rifle | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.565
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.565 | ca. 1964 | L: 50.75 in, Barrel length: 29 in, H: 7 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The Winchester Model 1200 slide action shotgun, in Standard Grade, was introduced in 1964. This all-new gun had a rifle-type, head-locking, rotating bolt with four lugs that lock into the barrel extension. This new design eliminated stress and strain to the gun's receiver during firing (Barnes: 1980). This experimental Model 1200 was submitted for sales approval but never manufactured with these engraved designs. | left bbl/WINCHESTER MADE IN U.S.A./MODEL 1200 - 12 GA. -2-3/4 CHAM. - WINCHESTER PROOF STEEL - FULL/ | Cataloged by BCD 4/91. | 12 gauge | A5 | 1988.8.565.JPG | dog | birds | game | firearm | alloy receiver black anodized | improvised trigger pull adjustment screw mounted on trigger | two-piece walnut | blued | front sight | repeating | cross bolt safety in forward trigger guard | tubular | magazine | stock | sporting | bolt jeweled and in the white | receiver | engraved | metal grip cap | varnished | red recoil pad | checkered | bead | rolled type | finish | slide release in rear | slide action | shotgun | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.298
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.298 | ca. 1930 | L: 49.25 in, Barrel length: 30 in, H: 7.375 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The Model 1897 slide action repeating shotgun was a revamped and greatly improved version of the Model 1893. An action slide lock was incorporated for safety and a wide variety of styles were introduced. The Model 1897 was the first Winchester shotgun to accommodate 2 3/4-inch shot shells, the first available in 16 gauge, and the first with solid frame or takedown features. It was the most famous visible hammer repeating shotgun made in America. The magazine holds five shells. Additional gloss information entered from written record 2/16/03: This new model was a revamped and greatly improved Winchester Model 1893 shotgun with several important changes: 1) The frame was strengthened and made longer to handle a 12 gauge 2-3/4 in. shell, as well as the 2-5/8 in. shell. 2) The frame at the top was covered so that the ejection of the fired shell was entirely from the side. 3)The gun could not be opened until a slight forward movement of the slide handle released the action slide lock. In firing, the recoil of the gun gave a slight forward motion to the slide handle and released the action slide lock, which enabled the immediate opening of the gun. In the absence of any recoil, the slide handle had to be pushed forward manually in order to release the action slide lock. 4) A movable cartridge guide was placed on the right side of the carrier block to prevent the escape of the shell when the gun was turned sideways in the act of loading. 5) The stock was made longer and with less drop. The model 1897 shotgun was first listed for sale in the November 1897 catalog, in 12 gauge solid frame only. The 12 gauge takedown was added in October 1898, the 16 gauge takedown was added in February 1900. Two piece walnut, oiled, grooved slide handle, semi-pistol grip, checkered Bakelite buttplate with old style Winchester trademark. Left side entirely cutaway from wrist through chamber area of barrel and magazine to demonstrate internal mechanism. The Model 1897 shotgun became popular immediately after its announcement and quickly outdistanced the sales of is principal competitors' models, the Spencer and Burgess guns. The Model 1897is the most famous visible hammer type repeating shotgun ever made in this country and is still used by a surprisingly large number of shooters who prefer the visible hammer type of mechanism. Discontinued in 1957, approximately 1,024,700 were made. The Model 1897 was followed by the Winchester Model 1900 rifle (Barnes 1980). | bolt actuating rod/MODEL 1897/-WINCHESTER-/TRADE MARK REG. IN U.S. PAT. OFF./barrel left/MANUFACTURED BY THE WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. NEW HAVE, CON (illegible) PAT. NOV. 25. 90. DEC. 6. 92. JULY 21. 96. FEB. 22. 98. JUNE 14-98. OCT. 16. 1900. DEC. (illegible)/receiver/E/5566__ | Winchester R & D label on left side of buttstock. | Model 1897 | 12 gauge | 5566___ (serial number cutoff due to the cutaway) | 1988.8.298v1.jpg | 1988.8.298v2.jpg | firearm | finish | full | shallow groove on receiver | blued overall, except for hammer, firing pin, springs, and miscellaneous parts which are in the white | semi-pistol grip | magazine | checkered bakelite buttplate | round barrel | oiled | tubular | rear sight | left side entirely cutaway from wrist through chamber area barrel and magazine to demonstrate internal mechanism | front sight | bead | stock | two-piece walnut | slide action | barrel | grooved slide handle | right side of receiver has two extra screws, one in front of receiver to retain barrel, and one in rear to retain pushpin | single barrel | sporting | cutaway | repeating | shotgun | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.278
Browning, J.M., Ogden, UT | ...
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1988.8.278 | ca. 1885 | L: 46 in, Barrel length: 27.125 in, H: 8.25 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The Model 1886 lever action repeating rifle was developed to handle powerful center fire cartridges. Based on a Browning patent (U.S. 306,577), with improvements by Winchester master designer William Mason, the Model 1886 incorporated strong vertical bolt locks and a very smooth action. Magazine capacity varied depending on magazine length and cartridge caliber (cartridges ranged from .33 W.C.F. to .50/110 Express). Receivers were casehardened until 1901, when blued finish became standard. This experimental sporting rifle was one of John Browning's first attempts with a lever action repeating design which led to the development of the Model 1886. The action on this sample must be open to release the loading gate on the right side to load cartridges into the magazine. | bottom receiver/76__/bbl/45 GOVT./ | Cataloged by BCD 4/91. The middle of the barrel is missing blue--from storage rack wear--and there is deep pitting on the right side of the lever. | experimental | .45-70 | 763X | 1988.8.278v1.jpg | 1988.8.278v2.jpg | firearm | checkered | magazine | adjustable | sporting | buttplate | receiver in the bright | curved | steel | stock | octagon barrel | front sight | tubular | blade | barrel and magazine tube blued | buckhorn | repeating | forend cap, lever, trigger, hammer, buttplate casehardened | experimental | barrel | rounded | finish | rear sight | deluxe walnut | varnished | Experimental John M. Browning Rifle Maker: Browning, J.M.; Ogden, UT Serial Number: 76XX Caliber: .45-70 Date: ca. 1885 Catalogue Number: 1988.8.278 Gift of Olin Corporation Winchester Arms Collection This experimental rifle represents one of Browning's first attempts to design a lever action rifle capable of using high velocity cartridges. | Browning, J.M., Ogden, UT

1988.8.199
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.199 | 1882-1883 | L: 48 in, Barrel length: 27 in, H: 0 in | The Model 1883 was a bolt action firearm designed for military use and was chambered for the 45-70 cartridge, the official cartridge of the U.S. Army at that time. It was an excellent weapon for military use and a reasonable quantity sold for this purpose. However, it had a very limited sale as a sporting arm. Shooters generally preferred the older, lever action type of mechanism with which they were familiar. This rifle was submitted to the War Department in 1882. The changes in this rifle were suggested by M. Clough, who was at that time superintendent of the W.R.A. Co. | Model 1883 Hotchkiss Musket | .45-70 | none | 1988.8.199.JPG | 1988.8.199.jpg | firearm | forearm | magazine | tubular | hotchkiss | experimental | barrel | round barrel | checked | factory study piece | musket | sample | military | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.174
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.174 | 1870-1871 | L: 48.75 in, Barrel length: 27.125 in, H: 7.5 in | This lever action rifle, designed by Luke Wheelock, has a carrier mechanism similar to the Winchester Models 1866 and 1873. It has no cover for the loading port, and loads through the side, ejecting from the top of the reservoir. | Model 1871 | .40 | non | 1988.8.174.JPG | firearm | walnut | barrel | stock | sporting model | tubular | rear sight | sporting type | front sight | beach type | magazine | luke wheelock, designer | lever action | octagon barrel | none | lever action | rifle | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.170
American | Winchester Repeat...
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1988.8.170 | ca. 1867 | L: 36.75 in, Barrel length: 19.25 in, H: 7.75 in | Lever action carbine, probably made in the late 1860's. Action is similar to the Winchester Model 1866, 1873, or 1876. Magazine tube below barrel. Receiver, lever, hammer, and buttplate are casehardened. Fluted breech bolt. Saddle ring on left side of receiver. Finger lever catch or lock pivoted in the rear of the finger lever bow. There is a safety in the mechanism which prevents the trigger being pulled unless the lever is all the way closed. This safety is released by a pin set at the top front of the finger loop. | on bottom of brass cartridge carrier/14/ | Model 1867 carbine | .44 Henry | 14 | 1988.8.170.JPG | firearm | magazine | casehardened receiver, lever, hammer, and buttplate | tubular | fluted breech bolt | finish | lever action | carbine | American | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.279
Browning Brothers, Ogden, UT...
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1988.8.279 | ca. 1885 | L: 45.75 in, Barrel length: 27.125 in, H: 8.25 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The Model 1886 lever action repeating rifle was developed to handle powerful center fire cartridges. Based on a Browning patent (U.S. 306,577), with improvements by Winchester master designer William Mason, the Model 1886 incorporated strong vertical bolt locks and a very smooth action. Magazine capacity varied depending on magazine length and cartridge caliber (cartridges ranged from .33 W.C.F. to .50/110 Express). Receivers were casehardened until 1901, when blued finish became standard. This experimental sporting rifle was one of John Browning's sample designs which led to the development of the Model 1886. The rifle has a two-piece bolt with a rising locking lug. | bbl top/45 GOVT/receiver top/BROWNING BROS, OGDEN, UT/rear sight/1876/ | Cataloged by BCD 4/91. The middle of the barrel is missing blue--from storage rack wear. There is rust on the receiver, barrel, end cap, and under forend. | Experimental John Browning | .45-70 | none | 1988.8.279v2.jpg | 1988.8.279v1.jpg | firearm | buttplate | repeating | blade | experimental | rounded | octagon barrel | open | checkered | sporting | rear sights | forend cap, lever, trigger, hammer, buttplate casehardened | steel | deluxe walnut | tubular | barrel | barrel and magazine tube blued | magazine | varnished | finish | curved | adjustable | stock | ladder | front sight | receiver in the bright | Experimental John M. Browning Rifle Maker: Browning Brothers; Ogden, UT Serial Number: None Caliber: .45-70 Date: ca. 1885 Catalogue Number: 1988.8.279 Gift of Olin Corporation Winchester Arms Collection This experimental rifle incorporates a number of design features which were used in the Winchester Model 1886. | Browning Brothers, Ogden, UT

1988.8.498
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.498 | 1892-1941 | L: 43 in, Barrel length: 24 in, H: 7 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The Model 1892 was a scaled down version of the Model 1886 and was designed for the popular mid-range calibers of the older Model 1873 (.32/20 W.C.F., .38/40 W.C.F., and .44/40 W.C.F.). Like the Model 1886, the Model 1892 used a double bolt-locking design and featured a fast and smooth lever action. It was tremendously popular in Australia and South America, as well as in the United States. Magazine capacity: rifle- 13 cartridges; carbine- 11 cartridges; musket- 17 cartridges. This Winchester Model 1892 is an experimental takedown, with a unique device/latch under the frame. | NONE | .44|40 | none | 1988.8.498v1.jpg | 1988.8.498v1.jpg | 1988.8.498v2.jpg | 1988.8.498v2.jpg | firearm | rifle | lever action | hammer | finish | magazine | in the white | tubular | repeating | takedown | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.304
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.304 | ca. 1916 | L: 40.375 in, Barrel length: 20.5 in, H: 7.5 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | The Model 1897 slide action repeating shotgun was a revamped and greatly improved version of the Model 1893. An action slide lock was incorporated for safety and a wide variety of styles were introduced. The Model 1897 was the first Winchester shotgun to accomodate 2 3/4-inch shot shells, the first available in 16 gauge, and the first with solid frame or takedown features. It was the most famous visible hammer repeating shotgun made in America. This shotgun is commonly called a trench gun, having received its title from the trench warfare of WWI. As a short, multiple projectile, close-range firearm it was well suited for the trench's confined quarters. The submachine gun of WWII replaced the trench gun in this role. However, the short barrel shotgun is still used anywhere a handy, close-range firearm is needed. This is a standard M/97 riot/trench gun, with the exception of the prototype hand guard/heat shield, bayonet lug, and sling swivel assembly. The hand guard is sheet metal which conforms to the barrel's shape and extends from 4 inches in front of the receiver to the bayonet lug attachment at the tube end. There are no perferations in the guard--only two dimples that hold it away from the barrel. The bayonet lug accepts a 1917 Enfield bayonet, however, the cross guard would need to be modified to fit over the barrel. Magazine capacity: 5 shot shells. | bottom receiver/E/555396/top receiver/[P superscribed over W in oval]/left side bbl/[covered by hand guard] CO. NEW HAVEN. CONNECICUT. U.S.A./[covered by hand guard] 8. OCT. 16. 1900. DEC. 25. 06. JULY 5. 10./12 GA. FULL/bolt actuating rod/MODEL 1897/-WINCHESTER-/TRADEMARK REG IN. U.S.A. PAT. OFF./ | Cataloged by BCD 4/91. There are some varnish drips on the buttstock. | Model 1897 | 12 gauge | 555396 | 1988.8.304v2.jpg | 1988.8.304v1.jpg | firearm | blued | repeating | finish | sling swivel | magazine | plastic buttplate | tubular | forend | hand guard/heat shield | grooved | semi-pistol grip | round | stock | upper sling swivel unit | slide action | walnut | bayonet lug | military | shotgun | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT

1988.8.437
Winchester Repeating Arms Co...
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1988.8.437 | L: 42 in, Barrel length: 24 in, H: 7 in | Gift of Olin Corporation, Winchester Arms Collection | This experimental Winchester rifle, designed by William Mason, is a remarkable piece, with contours of the iron receiver being almost identical to those of the Model 1873, only miniaturized. The machine work on this rifle is of exceptional quality. | Inscription? | .22 | not serially numbered | 1988.8.437v1.jpg | 1988.8.437v2.jpg | 1988.8.437v1.jpg | 1988.8.437v2.jpg | 1988.8.437.jpg | rifle | firearm | lever action | magazine | iron | barrel | octagon barrel | tubular | finish | in the white | receiver | repeating | experimental | Winchester Repeating Arms Co., New Haven, CT | Mason, William

1988.8.148
C.A. Waterbury | American | ...
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1988.8.148 | ca. 1855 | L: 52.5 in, Barrel length: 30.5 in, H: 9.5 in | This Waterbury rifle must have been made to take self-consuming cartridges or loaded bullets similar to those used in the Hunt, Jennings, or Volcanic firearms. There was no cartridge shell, for there is no way to eject an empty case. The cartridge must have been self-primed for there is no provision for a separate priming mechanism. The magazine was filled and the gun worked in the following manner. There is a tubular magazine located below and parallel with the barrel. A tube-shaped section of this magazine, 3-3/4 inches long, was moved about 3-1/2 inches toward the muzzle of the rifle. When this had been done, a coil magazine spring and follower were brought up into the forward section of the magazine tube. This action revealed an opening at the upper end of the true magazine. Into the magazine were dropped 10 or 11 cartridges, that is, loaded and primed bullets. Then the magazine opening was closed, and the follower was lowered until it rested against the bullet nearest the muzzle. Next the bolt was unlocked by lifting up on a swinging thumb piece at the end of the receiver, and by drawing back on the hooked shaped finger piece on the end of the bolt the latter was opened. Next a hook-shaped finger piece below the forward end of the stock was moved out away from the barrel, bringing down the carrier with it. Onto the top of this carrier a cartridge moved, forced into that position by the magazine spring. A long steel plate upon which the carrier and finger piece is fastened acts as a spring, so that when it is released the carrier moves back into position, bringing the cartridge into line with the chamber and at the same time acting as a magazine cutoff. The bolt had been cocked on the opening motion; when it was closed and the thumb piece turned down to the right, thus locking it in place, the rifle was ready to fire. There is a sliding safety device to the rear of the trigger, operated by a supplementary trigger projecting below the trigger guard. This also serves as an extra finger rest. The single set trigger is adjustable by utilizing a set screw working through the forward part of the trigger guard. No patent has been found for this action. It is not known who C.A. Waterbury was or where he worked. It is believed that this rifle was made about the middle of the 1850s, perhaps designed to sell in competion to the Jennings or Volcanic, probably the latter. | top of receiver/C.A. WATERBURY'S/VOLLEY RIFLE/ | 1988.8.148v2.jpg | 1988.8.148v1.jpg | firearm | rifle, repeating | sights | buttstock | open type | round barrel | heavy | barrel | magazine | rifle type | tubular | stock tip | remarkable mechanical operation | pewter | unique | plain | walnut | sporting | C.A. Waterbury | American