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NA.203.776
Eastern Plains | feather | W...
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NA.203.776 | ca. 1875 | L: 14.5 in, width: 3.125 in | Chandler-Pohrt Collection, Gift of Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Pohrt, Sr | Dress and Adornment - Personal Adornment and Ritual Regalia. Roach feather - single large eagle feather in polished bone holder wrapped with dark blue tradecloth; several small eagle feathers tied to base of large one with white string; bunch of red breath feathers, gray rabbit fur and a rattlesnake rattle are tied at mid-point of feather; rib from middle to top of feather is covered with a brown and yellow woven horsehair strip; tip of feather has gray rabbit fur and remnants of green breath feathers. | na.203.776dtl.jpg | na.203.776.jpg | feather | Woven | horsehair | rattlesnake | brown | eagle | string | feather | Tradecloth | fur | White | polished | holder | rattle | dark blue | bone | Gray | rabbit | yellow | Eastern Plains

NA.106.794
Tohono O'odham (Papago) | ba...
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NA.106.794 | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.794v4.jpg | na.106.794v5.jpg | na.106.794v6.jpg | na.106.794v7.jpg | na.106.794ab.jpg | na.106.794v1.jpg | na.106.794v2.jpg | na.106.794v3.jpg | basket | Woven | Papago basket. The Papago Indians, now know as the Tohono O'odam or "Desert People", are a fairly large tribe whose territory lies in southwestern Arizona. They traditionally spoke the Tepiman branch of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic family and are thought by scholars to be descendants of the early Hohokam civilization which once existed in that region. They are one of the few tribes that have consistently produced large quantities of baskets down to the present day. However, by about 1900 many of the Papago weavers switched from using their traditional willow, for weaving baskets, to the use of yucca leaf instead. The yucca leaf reduced the time it took to make a basket presumably in response to the growing market for their work among non-Indians. To a good extent, with the dropping of the willow, the quality of weave also seemed to decline, especially on larger pieces. This group of baskets include flat trivets or plaques, cylinder shapes (one with a handle) and one of the newer stripe split stitch-lidded baskets. Coiling is to the left using a bundle of bear grass (Nolina) for the foundation coil which is then sewn with yucca leaf either sun bleached or green. Designs are done in devils claw (Proboscidea) or in the red yucca root. These baskets are all made for the tourist trade. | Tohono O'odham (Papago)

NA.106.555
Nez Perce | corn husk bag | ...
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NA.106.555 | ca. 1895 | L: 25.5 in, width: 15.5 in | The Crow Indian collection of Dr. William and Anna Petzoldt, Gift of their daughter Genevieve Fitzgerald | Utensils and Implements - Household. Corn husk bag - woven husks with geometric pattern in green, brown, red yarn and brown husks; leather around opening; leather draw string. | na.106.555v2.jpg | na.106.555v1.jpg | NA.106.555.JPG | geometric | corn husk bag | Woven | husks | leather | draw string | yarn | Nez Perce

1.69.1591B
mat | Woven | small | Navajo
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1.69.1591B | L: 14 in, width: 9.5 in | Gift of Irving H. "Larry" Larom Estate | Small woven Navajo table top mat with figures and geometric design, n.d. | 1.69.1591B.JPG | 1.69.1591b.view2.jpg | geometric | figures | mat | Woven | small | Navajo

NA.106.558
burden basket | Woven | Red ...
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NA.106.558 | Diameter: 18.5 in | Utensils and Implements - Household. Burden basket - wooden hoop covered with knotted string in plain, red and blue crossed sticks across hoop; oval pad and strap of woven reeds on front. | na.106.558.JPG | na.106.558.jpg | burden basket | Woven | Red | reeds | knotted | sticks | blue | string | wood

NA.106.163
Apache | basket | Woven | re...
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NA.106.163 | 1880's | H: 14.25 in, width: 16.625 in, depth: 13.125 in | Utensils and implements - Household. Burden basket - woven reed with 6 leather fringe strips on the sides. Four striped pattern around the sides in red and black. Bottom woven separately and attached from inside. | na.106.163.jpg | striped | basket | Woven | reed | fringe | leather | Apache

1.69.1705
chair, toy | Woven | wood | ...
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1.69.1705 | H: 15.375 in, width: 7.25 in, depth: 6.25 in | Gift of Ms. Sarah Fritjofson | Chair, toy. wood frame stainedbrown with a herringbone pattern woven split willow seat, also stained brown, turned back posts with finial tops and tapered legs. Four arched slats fit into slots in back posts, front legs have rounded tops 1/2" above seat level and tapered bottoms. Simple turned stretcher bars at front, sides and back. Parts fit into each other with no nails used in construction. | 1.69.1705.jpg | chair, toy | Woven | wood | turned | Willow

NA.302.53
Mexico | blanket | Woven | b...
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NA.302.53 | L: 97 in, width: 47.5 in | Structures and Furnishings: Dwellings and Furnishings. Woven wool with thin black and blue stripes on white ground; fringe at both ends. | NA.302.53.JPG | stripes | blanket | Woven | black | White | blue | fringe | wool | Mexico

24.85.1
sash | Woven | wool
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24.85.1 | L: 118.5 in, width: 6.25 in | Gift of Mrs. T.R (Neva) Goodwin | Charles M. Russell characteristically wore a colorful voyageur sash. He gave this one as a gift to his friend, Philip R. Goodwin. | Description: Woven wool sash; red background with beige, yellow and green woven design. Fringe at either end. | 24.85.JPG | sash | Woven | wool

NA.506.51
Pomo | miniature basket | sp...
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NA.506.51 | H: .25 in, L: .969 in, width: .5 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds, woven-in design of 12 rough diamond shapes in dyed dark brown on natural tan backgrond with dark brown edge at basket opening. | NA.506.51VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.51VIEW2.JPG | na.506.51v2.jpg | na.506.51v1.jpg | rough diamond shapes | miniature basket | split reeds | Woven | dark brown | natural tan | Coiled | dyed | Pomo

NA.106.746
Western Apache | basket | Wo...
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NA.106.746 | ca. 1890 | Diameter: 13 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.746v2.jpg | na.106.746v3.jpg | na.106.746v4.jpg | na.106.746.jpg | na.106.746v1.jpg | basket | Woven | Western Apache tray. The Western Apache were traditionally Athabaskan speakers who migrated from their homeland in the interior of northern Canada to the American southwest during late pre-historic times. Since complex coiled basketry was all but unknown among the Canadian Athabaskans it is assumed that the Apache learned how to weave such baskets after their arrival in the southwest, possibly from the Pueblo Indians of the Yuman speaking peoples such as the Yavapai who were in the southwest before the Apache and whose baskets are most similar to their work. The Western Apache are divided in four different groups: Tonto, Cibeque, White Mountain and San Carlos. Their baskets are mostly indistinguishable consequently; the term Western Apache is applied to this body of basket wearing. The Apache called tray forms such as this "tsa niskagi". The polychrome design exhibits a central star of flower motif with elements (perhaps representing butterflies) floating within the open ground. The rim has been finished off using full rim ticking (alternating white and black stitches). Coiling is to the left using three peeled cotton wood (Populus) rods for the foundation of the coil. Sewing materials are peeled cottonwood for the white, split devils claw (Proboscidea) for the black and perhaps yucca root (Yucca) fore the red design elements. | Western Apache

NA.506.49
Pomo | miniature basket | sp...
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NA.506.49 | ca. 1900s | H: .5 in, Diameter: 1.25 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with black and clear amber beads woven into outside in a design of 4 black (design)(looks like a capital L laid face down left) on amber background. | NA.506.49VIEW2.JPG | NA.506.49VIEW1.JPG | na.506.49.jpg | miniature basket | split reeds | Woven | Beads | black | clear amber | Coiled | Pomo

NA.106.798
Cherokee | basket | Woven
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NA.106.798 | ca. 1950 | Diameter: 11 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.798.jpg | na.106.798v2.jpg | na.106.798v4.jpg | na.106.798v1.jpg | na.106.798v3.jpg | basket | Woven | Cherokee

NA.203.580
Unknown | sash | Woven | yar...
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NA.203.580 | L: 47.5 in, width: 2.375 in | Dress and Adornment - Personal Adornment and Ritual Regalia. Cloth sash - woven yarn (wool?); stripe and bar design in red, white, black, orange, yellow and green; yarn fringe at both ends. | NA.203.580.JPG | na.203.580.jpg | stripe | bar | sash | Woven | yarn | fringe | Unknown

1.69.2766
Portrait | Woven | matte boa...
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1.69.2766 | L: 4.125 in, width: 2.375 in, frame length: 7.25 in, Frame width: 5.5 in | Facisimile signature underneath flag, woven: W. F. Cody=Buffalo Bill | Silk portrait of Buffalo Bill, souvenir. Woven silk with head and shoulders portrait of Buffalo Bill in Wild West Show garb in black and white. Underneath portrait are U.S. flags and a federal shield with an eagle on top in red, white, blue and gold. Underneath flags are facsimile signatures. Silk is mounted between two pieces of mat board, top one has an arched top cutout and is painted gold, bottom one is painted pink, back side has remnants of burgundy velvet stuck to old glue. Silk is stained, mat has creases at center top and right bottom and torn edges. | 1.69.2766.JPG | federal shield | flag | eagle | Cody, William F. | Portrait | Woven | matte board | velvet | silk | pigment

NA.106.760
Western Apache | basket | Wo...
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NA.106.760 | ca. 1900 | Diameter: 19 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.760v1.jpg | na.106.760.jpg | na.106.760v2.jpg | na.106.760v3.jpg | na.106.760v4.jpg | dog | basket | Woven | Western Apache figured tray. The Western Apache were traditionally Athabaskan speakers who migrated from their homeland in the interior of northern Canada to the American southwest during late pre-historic times. Since complex coiled basketry was all but unknown among the Canadian Athabaskans it is assumed that the Apache learned how to weave such baskets after their arrival in the southwest, possibly from the Pueblo Indians of the Yuman speaking peoples such as the Yavapai who were in the southwest before the Apache and whose baskets are most similar to their work. The Western Apache are divided in four different groups: Tonto, Cibeque, White Mountain and San Carlos. Their baskets are mostly indistinguishable consequently; the term Western Apache is applied to this body of basket wearing. This superb large tray displays a central star tondo typical, but not necessarily exclusive to San Carlos Apache work. The checkerboard band represents beads and there are thirteen dos standing, evenly spaced, atop this band. The outer four coils suggest that this basket was finished at a later time possibly by a different weaver although the stitching suggests the same hand. Coiling is to the left using three peeled cottonwood (Populus) or willow (salix) rods for the foundation of the coil. The sewing splints are peeled cottonwood for the white (now aged a light honey color) or even a combination of the two and devils claw (Proboscidea) for the black design elements. Exceptionally fine weave for such a large piece. | Western Apache

NA.106.757
Plateau | basket | Woven
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NA.106.757 | ca. 1920 | L: 9.5 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.757.v2.jpg | na.106.757.v1.jpg | na.106.757v3.jpg | na.106.757v4.jpg | na.106.757v1.jpg | na.106.757v2.jpg | basket | Woven | Plateau (most likely Nez Perce) cornhusk bag. The Nez Perce traditionally spoke one of the Penutian languages and continue to live in the plateau region of western Montana and Idaho. Like many of the plateau tribes, their material culture exhibited strong influences form the Great Plains Indian groups and included even some cultural influence from the Northwest coast tribal groups. Some of the most characteristic objects of Nez Perce material culture are cornhusk bags: soft twined bags woven of native hemp, cornhusk and commercial wool yarns (this latter material appeases most often in bags woven after 1880). These were most typically large flat bags with designs on both sides. This rather small example may have been intended to be carried something like a purse, by a Nez Perce woman in fine or ceremonial dress. The soft twined construction is done using native hemp for the weft and cotton cord for the warp. The outer surface of the bag is done in a false embroidery technique using cornhusk. The colored design elements are all executed in commercial wool yarns. | Plateau

NA.106.640
White Mountain Apache | olla...
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NA.106.640 | 1988 | H: 10.5 in, width: 28 in | Given in memory of Frank O. Horton and Henriette S. Horton | Utensils and Implements, Household. Basket, olla, made of woven reeds and crods. Lined with pitch. Handle of thin rope is attached to two loops made of braided horse hair (brown and tan) twisted together. Basket tilts to one side. | NA.106.640.JPG | olla | Woven | pitch | hair | horse | cords | rope | reeds | braided | White Mountain Apache

NA.506.44
Pomo | miniature basket | Wo...
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NA.506.44 | H: 1 in, Diameter: 2.25 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split needs, checkerboard design of natural reed alternating with dyed black on the bottom half and red brown on the top half. ound with convex sides.. | NA.506.44VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.44VIEW2.JPG | NA.506.44VIEW3.JPG | na.506.44.jpg | checkerboard design | miniature basket | Woven | split reeds | black | Coiled | natural color | dyed | red brown | Pomo

NA.106.201
bag | Woven | yarn | fiber
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NA.106.201 | 1920 | L: 20.5 in, width: 14.5 in | Gift of J.W. Duke Wellington | Utensils and implements - Household. Corn husk bag - woven fiber and yarn bag. Stepped check designs on one side in grey, red & black; outlined diamond designs on the reverse side in blue, red, yellow, orange & purple. | NA.106.201.SIDE1.JPG | NA.106.201.SIDE2.JPG | na.106.201v1.jpg | na.106.201v2.jpg | check | Diamond | bag | Woven | yarn | fiber

NA.302.114
Navajo | rug | wool | Woven ...
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NA.302.114 | width: 66.5 in, L: 91.125 in | In memory of Frank O. Horton and Henriette S. Horton | Structures and Furnishings, Dwellings and Furnishings. Woven rug with alternating designs of stripes and checkerboard diamonds. Colors are red, blue and white. | na.302.114v1.jpg | na.302.114v2.jpg | Diamond | stripes | checks | rug | wool | Woven | dyed | Navajo

NA.506.50
Pima | Akimal O'odam | minia...
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NA.506.50 | H: .5 in, Diameter: .75 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with 3 pair of connected cross designs in dark brown with light brown centers on natural tan background. | NA.506.50VIEW2.JPG | NA.506.50VIEW1.JPG | na.506.50.jpg | crosses | miniature basket | Coiled | split reeds | Woven | dark brown | dyed | natural tan | light brown | Pima | Akimal O'odam

NA.106.777
Yokuts | basket | Woven
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NA.106.777 | Late 19th Century | Diameter: 17 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.777.jpg | basket | Woven | Yokuts bowl. The Yokuts, whose members traditionally spoke the Yokutsan language (of the old Penutian linguistic family), lived in the central San Juaquin Valley region of California. Their territory stretched roughly from just south of Sacramento to what is now Bakersfield. They were formerly called the Tulare Indians by the Spanish settlers meaning "people of the tules", tule being a type of marsh plant found in the shallow lakes and wetlands throughout traditional Yokuts territory. They were at one time a very large tribe with sixty-three sub-tribal divisions with estimates of 25,000 to 35,000 people in 1772 when the Spanish first arrived in the area (Latta). Today their population has shrank to a fraction of that number. The Yokuts were particularly famous for their elaborate polychrome baskets of which this a very fine example. While cooking bowls are usually deep, occasionally a shallow sharply flared bowl such as this example was made and may have been intended fro the Washing Ceremony which was associated with mourning rites. This bowl displays five bands of design with the band second from the top representing stylized butterflies. These number bands of small geometric units suggest a possible origin of the Porterville region for this basket. Sewing splints are split sedge root (Carex) for the tan, split non-peeled redbud (Cercis) for the red and dyed bracken fern root (Pteridium) for the black. A very interesting basket. | Yokuts

NA.506.55
Pomo | miniature basket | Wo...
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NA.506.55 | H: .219 in, L: .5 in, width: .375 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with woven-in dyed dark brown V's on a natural tan background and a dark brown top edge. | NA.506.55VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.55VIEW2.JPG | na.506.55.jpg | V's | miniature basket | Woven | split reeds | dyed | Coiled | natural tan | dark brown | Pomo