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NA.506.57
Pomo | miniature basket | Co...
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NA.506.57 | H: .125 in, L: .375 in, width: .281 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with 6 dyed dark brown diamonds woven-in around the sides. | NA.506.57VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.57VIEW2.JPG | na.506.57.jpg | diamonds | miniature basket | Coiled | Woven | dyed | split reeds | dark brown | Pomo

NA.506.44
Pomo | miniature basket | Wo...
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NA.506.44 | H: 1 in, Diameter: 2.25 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split needs, checkerboard design of natural reed alternating with dyed black on the bottom half and red brown on the top half. ound with convex sides.. | NA.506.44VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.44VIEW2.JPG | NA.506.44VIEW3.JPG | na.506.44.jpg | checkerboard design | miniature basket | Woven | split reeds | black | Coiled | natural color | dyed | red brown | Pomo

NA.106.789
Pomo | basket | Woven
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NA.106.789 | ca. 1920 | Diameter: 5.125 in, depth: 2.75 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.789.jpg | basket | Woven | Pomo twined tray. The Pomo are a large tribe divided into seven groups each traditionally speaking a distinct dialect of the Pomo language, which is part of the Hokan linguistic stock. Their name means "People of the Red Earth" in reference to a red mineral pigment that they dug both for their own use and for trade. Their region of habitation was what are now the counties of Sonoma, Mendocino and Lake in northwestern California. Famous for their basketry, this northern California tribe produced a great variety of finely executed baskets. However, little is discussed in the literature about the less elaborate Pomo utilitarian baskets. This tray is a very small example of the larger multipurpose basket that could have been used for winnowing, parching or utilized in the process of sifting acorn flour, a staple in the traditional diet. Perhaps a small piece like this was used as a scoop. It displays two simple bands of design but utilizes four different types of twining in the baskets construction: three-strand, diagonal, lattice and plain twining. Whole, peeled willow (Salix) rod for the warp, split sedge root (Carex) for the light brown weft, natural redbud (Cercis) for the red design bands. | Pomo

NA.506.47
Pomo | miniature basket | sm...
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NA.506.47 | mid-1800s to early 1900s | H: .75 in, Diameter: 1.75 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with tufts of small feathers woven into outside. Feathers are orange and canary yellow with black bases, worked into a 4-pointed star of orange with yellow V's and orange triangles between the star points. | NA.506.47VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.47VIEW2.JPG | na.506.47.jpg | 4 point star | V's | triangles | miniature basket | small | canary yellow | Coiled | orange | Woven | feathers | split reeds | Pomo

NA.106.775
Pomo | basket | Woven
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NA.106.775 | Late 19th Century | Diameter: 7 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.775.jpg | na.106.775v3.jpg | na.106.775v4.jpg | na.106.775v1.jpg | na.106.775v2.jpg | basket | Woven | Pomo feathered hanging basket. The Pomo are a large tribe divided into seven groups each traditionally speaking a distinct dialect of the Pomo language, which is part of the Hokan linguistic stock. Their name means "People of the Red Earth" in reference to a red mineral pigment that they dug both for their own use and for trade. Their region of habitation was what are now the counties of Sonoma, Mendocino and Lake in northwestern California. Famous for their basketry, this northern California tribe produced a great variety of finely executed baskets. By the late 19th century, the Pomo were the only California tribe that continued to produce fully feathered baskets. These shallow circular baskets or trays, often hung with beaded shell pendants, wee know as sun trays tin reference to Pomo mythology. The design, executed in feathers, is of triangle done in green iridescent feathers against a background of yellow and red (near the rim) feathers. Abalone pendants are suspended from short glass trade bead dangles and a row of native made clamshell beads surrounds the rim. There are remnants of quail topknots associated with these shell heads. A very unusual feature of this basket is the row of red glass trade beads on the basket's interior. Coiling is to the left using three peeled willow (Salix) rods for the foundation of the coil. Sewing splints are split peeled sedge root (Carex) and there are no designs within the basketry itself. The coiling is called ci-bu (three rod) and the full feathering "ta'-pika". About 30% of the feathering is missing most likely due to moth damage. An old brass tag attached to the basket's rim reads "A70". A fine example in spite of the feather loss. | Pomo

NA.506.55
Pomo | miniature basket | Wo...
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NA.506.55 | H: .219 in, L: .5 in, width: .375 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with woven-in dyed dark brown V's on a natural tan background and a dark brown top edge. | NA.506.55VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.55VIEW2.JPG | na.506.55.jpg | V's | miniature basket | Woven | split reeds | dyed | Coiled | natural tan | dark brown | Pomo

NA.106.776
Pomo | Northern California |...
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NA.106.776 | Late 19th Century | Diameter: 9 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.776v4.jpg | na.106.776v5.jpg | na.106.776.jpg | na.106.776v1.jpg | na.106.776v2.jpg | na.106.776v3.jpg | basket | abalone | clam | shell | root | Willow | Woven | feathers | Pomo feathered hanging basket. The Pomo are a large tribe divided into seven groups each traditionally speaking a distinct dialect of the Pomo language, which is part of the Hokan linguistic stock. Their name means "People of the Red Earth" in reference to a red mineral pigment that they dug both for their own use and for trade. Their region of habitation was what are now the counties of Sonoma, Mendocino and Lake in northwestern California. Famous for their basketry, this northern California tribe produced a great variety of finely executed baskets. By the late 19th century, the Pomo were the only California tribe that continued to produce fully feathered baskets. These shallow circular baskets or trays, often hung with beaded shell pendants, were known as sun trays tin reference to Pomo mythology. The design is of a radiating star made up of a graded series of triangles don e in yellow feathers against a background of dark iridescent green feathers. Abalone pendants are suspended from short clamshell bead dangles and a row of native made clamshell beads surrounds the rim. There are some remaining quail topknots on the basket's rim as well. The basket can be suspended from its original hanging strap of native made clamshell beads. Coiling is to the left using three peeled willow (Salix) rods for the foundation of the coil. Sewing splints are split peeled sedge root (Carex) and there are no designs within the basketry itself. The coiling is called ci-bu (three rod) and the full feathering "ta'-pika". Almost all the feathering is intact. A beautiful piece in excellent condition. | Pomo | Northern California

NA.106.246
Pomo | California | basket |...
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NA.106.246 | unknown | wide at widest point: 9 in, H: 3.75 in, diameter of opening: 5.625 in | Museum purchase, Dr. Robert L. Anderson Collection | "Pomo feathered treasure basket R.L. Anderson 674" on tag. | Utensils and implements - Household. Basket - dark geometric designs with white seed beads periodically sewn in. There are three sets of shell beads trimmed with black feathers set around the rim. || Coiled basket on a one rod willow foundation. Bracken fern (black) and redbud (red) are used for the design with clam shell and glass beads, woodpecker feathers and quail plumes (Bryn Potter: 7/2013- AMD). | NA.106.246.JPG | NA.106.246.JPG | NA.106.246dtl.JPG | geometric | dark | basket | quail feathers | bracken fern root | woodpecker feathers | Willow | redbud | clam shell beads | string | glass beads | sedge root | Pomo | California

NA.506.46
Pomo | miniature basket | Wo...
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NA.506.46 | mid 1800s | H: 1.125 in, Diameter: 2 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with double 5 point star design in natural and dyed black; natural star has the basket opening as its center and the arms go around the sides to the bottom; black star has a natural circle at the bottom of the basket as its center and the arms go up the sides to the basket opening. | NA.506.46VIEW2.JPG | NA.506.46VIEW3.JPG | NA.506.46VIEW1.JPG | na.506.46.jpg | 5 point star design | miniature basket | Woven | split reeds | natural color | black | dyed | Coiled | Pomo

NA.106.530
Pomo | California | basket |...
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NA.106.530 | early 19th century | H: 2.75 in, Diameter: 5.75 in, wide at widest point: 6 in, diameter of opening: 4.125 in | Museum purchase, Dr. Robert L. Anderson Collection | Utensils and implements - Household. Basket - round bowl made of woven grass; zig-zag design in black. Early 1800's Pomo Treasure Basket. Pomo (Turnbough 1981) (Turnbough identified tribal affiliation 7-1-88 EAB). AET Ancient Pomo Milling Basket Finest Quality. || Coiled basket on a one rod willow foundation with a bracken fern used for the dark design (Bryn Potter: 7/2013- AMD). | NA.106.530.JPG | zigzag | basket | sedge root | bracken fern root | Willow | Pomo | California

NA.506.60
Pomo | miniature basket | dy...
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NA.506.60 | H: .125 in, Diameter: .188 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with a woven-in dyed dark brown V's whose open ends are 1 coil below the top edge. | NA.506.60view1.JPG | NA.506.60view2.JPG | na.506.60.jpg | V's | miniature basket | dyed | Coiled | dark brown | split reeds | Woven | Pomo

NA.506.49
Pomo | miniature basket | sp...
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NA.506.49 | ca. 1900s | H: .5 in, Diameter: 1.25 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with black and clear amber beads woven into outside in a design of 4 black (design)(looks like a capital L laid face down left) on amber background. | NA.506.49VIEW2.JPG | NA.506.49VIEW1.JPG | na.506.49.jpg | miniature basket | split reeds | Woven | Beads | black | clear amber | Coiled | Pomo

NA.106.781
Pomo | basket | Woven
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NA.106.781 | Late 19th Century | Diameter: 17 in, depth: 6 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.781.jpg | basket | Woven | Pomo winnowing tray. The Pomo are a large tribe divided into seven groups each traditionally speaking a distinct dialect of the Pomo language, which is part of the Hokan linguistic stock. Their name means "People of the Red Earth" in reference to a red mineral pigment that they dug both for their own use and for trade. Their region of habitation was what are now the counties of Sonoma, Mendocino and Lake in northwestern California. Famous for their basketry, this northern California tribe produced a great variety of finely executed baskets. However, little is discussed in the literature about the less elaborate Pomo utilitarian baskets. This tray is a multipurpose basket that could have been used for winnowing, parching or utilized in the process of sifting acorn flour, a staple in the traditional diet. Three major bands of design are exhibited on this tray. Of note, the large outer band of zigzag design marks are most usually found on Pomo twined baskets as opposed to their coiled work. Several types of twining were employed in weaving this piece. The center was done in three-strand twining and the raised bands were done in lattice twining. The balance of the basket was woven in plain twining. Whole, peeled willow (Salix) rod for the warp, split sedge root (Carex) for the light brown weft, natural redbud (Cercis) for the red design elements. A good, old example. | Pomo

NA.506.52
Pomo | miniature basket | dy...
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NA.506.52 | H: .189 in, L: .625 in, width: .375 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds dyed dark brown. | NA.506.52VIEW2.JPG | NA.506.52VIEW1.JPG | na.506.52.jpg | miniature basket | dyed | Woven | split reeds | dark brown | Coiled | Pomo

NA.506.58
Pomo | miniature basket | Wo...
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NA.506.58 | H: .125 in, Diameter: .283 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with a woven-in design of 6 dyed dark brown V's connecting at top edge. | NA.506.58VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.58VIEW2.JPG | na.506.58.jpg | V's connecting | miniature basket | Woven | split reeds | dark brown | Coiled | dyed | Pomo

1.67.294
Pomo | tray | Willow | split
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1.67.294 | L: 12.75 in, width: 12 in | Gift of The Coe Foundation | Pomo winnowing tray made of split willow, handle on one side. Gift of above source, 1967 Catalog No. 490. | 1.67.294.jpg | tray | Willow | split | Pomo

NA.506.51
Pomo | miniature basket | sp...
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NA.506.51 | H: .25 in, L: .969 in, width: .5 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds, woven-in design of 12 rough diamond shapes in dyed dark brown on natural tan backgrond with dark brown edge at basket opening. | NA.506.51VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.51VIEW2.JPG | na.506.51v2.jpg | na.506.51v1.jpg | rough diamond shapes | miniature basket | split reeds | Woven | dark brown | natural tan | Coiled | dyed | Pomo

NA.203.1801
Arizona | Pomo | necklace | ...
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NA.203.1801 | 19th century | diameter at narrowest: 0.25 in, diameter at widest: 0.50 in, L: 2 in, wide at widest point: 1.0 in | The Paul Dyck Plains Indian Buffalo Culture Collection, acquired through the generosity of the Dyck family and additional gifts of the Nielson Family and the Estate of Margaret S. Coe | Long string of beads. Shell beads, blue "Padre" glass beads, red and white tubular glass beads, and a large tubular pipestone pendant. | NA.203.1801.JPG | necklace | strand of beads | glass beads | cotton string | shoelace | pipestone | Arizona | Pomo

NA.111.44
Pomo | cradle | carved | str...
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NA.111.44 | ca. 1850 ? | L: 19.5 in, width: 11.75 in, H: 12.375 in | Utensils and implements - Child Care, Training and Education. Cradle - willow rods tied together with string; carved at one end open at the opposite end; willow rods attached to willow hoop at open end. | NA.111.44.JPG | na.111.44.jpg | cradle | carved | string | Willow | Pomo

NA.106.780
Pomo | basket | Woven
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NA.106.780 | ca. 1880 | L: 15 in, width: 7.5 in, depth: 2.75 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.780.jpg | basket | Woven | Pomo "boat" shaped basket. The Pomo are a large tribe divided into seven groups each traditionally speaking a distinct dialect of the Pomo language, which is part of the Hokan linguistic stock. Their name means "People of the Red Earth" in reference to a red mineral pigment that they dug both for their own use and for trade. Their region of habitation was what are now the counties of Sonoma, Mendocino and Lake in northwestern California. Famous for their basketry, this northern California tribe produced a great variety of finely executed baskets. These oval baskets are sometimes referred to as a "boat" shaped basket but their original intent or function remains unknown. (An exception is a large example documented by Mason that he says was used as a shaman's basket). The design exhibited by this basket is a fairly elaborate one of broad zigzag bands edged in fine serrates which is frequently found on these single rod baskets. Native made white clamshell beads, each topped with a glass seed bead, are interspersed around the basket as are quail topknots. Coiling is to the left using a single peeled willow (Salix) rod for the foundation of the coil. Sewing splints are split sedge root (Carex) for the tan and bulrush root (Scirpus) which has not been dyed for the brown design elements. A fairly large example. | Pomo

1.67.127
Northern California | Pomo |...
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1.67.127 | Diameter: 4.75 in, H: 2.75 in, diameter of opening: 3.75 in | Gift of The Coe Foundation | Small Pomo basket of coiled weave basketry, natural color with dark brown in geometric design throughout, n.d. | Coiled interlock stitch sedge root Pomo basket on a one rod willow foundation with a redbud and bracken fern root design (Bryn Potter: 7/2013- AMD). | 1.67.127.jpg | geometric | basket | redbud | bracken fern root | sedge root | Willow | Northern California | Pomo

NA.506.59
Pomo | miniature basket | Co...
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NA.506.59 | H: .125 in, Diameter: .25 in | Ritual and Recreation: Gifts and Novelties. Coiled basket of woven split reeds with 6 woven-in dyed dark brown triangles. | NA.506.59VIEW1.JPG | NA.506.59VIEW2.JPG | na.506.59.jpg | triangles | miniature basket | Coiled | dyed | dark brown | split reeds | Woven | Pomo

NA.106.765
Pomo | basket | Woven
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NA.106.765 | ca. 1900 | Diameter: 2 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.765.jpg | na.106.765v1.jpg | na.106.765v2.jpg | na.106.765v3.jpg | na.106.765v4.jpg | basket | Woven | Pomo fully feathered miniature gift bowl. The Pomo are a large tribe divided into seven groups each traditionally speaking a distinct dialect of the Pomo language, which is part of the Hokan linguistic stock. Their name means "People of the Red Earth" in reference to a red mineral pigment that they dug both for their own use and for trade. Their region of habitation was what are now the counties of Sonoma, Mendocino and Lake in northwestern California. Famous for their basketry, this northern California tribe produced a great variety of finely executed baskets. Pomo were one of the few tribes to decorate some of their baskets using either feathers, native made shell beads, trade beads, or some combination of such. This fine little example is fully feathered in iridescent green mallard feathers and the basket's rim is decorated with quail topknots. Coiling is to the left using three peeled willow (Salix) rods for the foundation of the coil and called "ba'm-subu" by the Pomo. Sewing splints are split sedge root (Carex) for the white and there are not woven designs on the basket. A striking example of miniature basketry from this famous tribal group. | Pomo

NA.106.767
Pomo | cradle | Woven
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NA.106.767 | ca. 1890 | L: 13 in | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harris A. Thompson | na.106.767.jpg | na.106.767v1.jpg | na.106.767v2.jpg | na.106.767v3.jpg | na.106.767v4.jpg | cradle | Woven | Pomo model baby cradle. The Pomo are a large tribe divided into seven groups each traditionally speaking a distinct dialect of the Pomo language, which is part of the Hokan linguistic stock. Their name means "People of the Red Earth" in reference to a red mineral pigment that they dug both for their own use and for trade. Their region of habitation was what are now the counties of Sonoma, Mendocino and Lake in northwestern California. Famous for their basketry, this northern California tribe produced a great variety of baskets and this cradle is an example of that variety. Such cradles comprise a very old type of basket that was once common throughout northern California. Pomos were the only cultural group, with very rare exception, to produce these basketry cradles into the late 19th and 20th centuries. Construction is of peeled willow (Salix) rods arranged in an open twined fashion using cotton cord. | Pomo