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The Lasso
Ranney, William | Painting |...
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22.99.1 | 1846 | H: 32 in, width: 42.5 in, Frame height: 40.25 in, Frame width: 50.75 in, frame depth: 4 in | The Lasso | Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran | Ranney traveled to Texas in 1836 to serve in the Texas Army. His observations there provided inspiration for many of his western paintings. The Lasso depicts the struggle between the wild horse and the frontiersman. The "White Steed of the Prairie," a popular legend about a mythic emblem of wild freedom, probably also fueled Ranney's interests. | Ranney frame Inscriptions The Lasso, 22.99.1 Frame Labels: upper left label: Crate #9/ Ptg #2 upper right label: Exhibition: / THE WORK OF WILLIAM RANNEY/ Title THE LASSO/ Cat. No./ Lender Mr. Claude J. Ranney/ Address Sugartown Road/ Malvern, Pennsylvania upper right small label: APG 5753 D | LL: Ranney/1846 | Magazine: American Art Review: The Art of William Ranney by Sarah E. Boehme, American Arts Media, Inc., Leawood, Volume XVIII, Number 3, May-June 2006, page 93 | 22.99.1.jpg | 22.99.1.jpg | 22.99.1.jpg | 22.99.1.web.jpg | horse | wild | frontiersman | lasso | roping | Prairie | Painting | oil on canvas | William Ranney (1813 - 1857) The Lasso 1846, oil on canvas Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran, 22.99.1 Ranney had traveled to Texas in 1836 to serve in the Texas Army. His observations there provided inspiration for many of his western paintings, such as The Lasso, with its depiction of the struggle between the wild horse and the frontiersman. The "White Steed of the Prairie," a popular legend about a mythic emblem of wild freedom, probably also fueled Ranney's interests. | William Ranney (1813-1857) The Lasso 1846, oil on canvas Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran, 22.99.1 Ranney traveled to Texas in 1836 to serve in the Texas Army. His observations there provided inspiration for many of his western paintings. The Lasso depicts the struggle between the wild horse and the frontiersman. The "White Steed of the Prairie," a popular legend about a mythic emblem of wild freedom, probably also fueled Ranney's interests in the subject. | Ranney, William

Advice on the Pra...
Ranney, William | Painting |...
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10.91 | 1853 | H: 38.75 in, width: 55.25 in, Frame height: 45.625 in, Frame width: 61.325 in, frame depth: 3.125 in | Advice on the Prairie | Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran | Ranney painted "genre" paintings, scenes of everyday life on the American frontier. In this painting he portrayed a group of Western immigrants, including a family, camped with their wagon for the evening. They listen to tales of what they will encounter from a mountain man, the representative of an earlier period of frontier history. | LR, in script: W. Ranney./..53 | Magazine: Cowboys & Indians: 15 Paintings: The Story of the Amercian West has been Told in Blood, Sweat, Tears-and Paint by Emily Sachar, USFR Media Group, October 2008, page 130. | 10.91.jpg | 10.91.v1.jpg | 10.91.jpg | 10.91.JPG | 10.91.v1.jpg | 10.91.v1.jpg | 10.91.v1.web.jpg | Prairie | pioneers | covered | wagon | Painting | oil on canvas | William Ranney (1813 - 1857) Advice on the Prairie 1853, oil on canvas Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran,10.91 Ranney painted "genre" paintings, scenes of everyday life on the American frontier. In this painting he portrayed a group of Western immigrants, including a family, camped with their wagon for the evening. They listen to tales of what they will encounter from a mountain man, the representative of an earlier period of frontier history. | William Ranney was best known for his scenes of everyday life on the American frontier. In this painting he portrayed a group of Western immigrants, including a family with young children, camped with their wagon for the evening. They listen intently to tales of what they might encounter on their journey from a seated scout, who represents an earlier era of frontier history. The young woman standing to the rear cradling an infant represents the “Prairie Madonna,” who personified manifest destiny and the idea that Euro-American populations had a divine right to settle the West. | Ranney, William

Study for Hunting...
Ranney, William | Drawing | ...
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22.99.2 | ca. 1836-1846 | H: 5.5 in, width: 7.75 in, Sheet height: 7 in, Sheet width: 10 in, Frame height: 11.5 in, Frame width: 13.5 in, frame depth: 2 in | Study for Hunting Wild Horses | Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran | Ranney's sketch conveys the energy and power associated with wild horses. In 1836 when the artist was in Texas, he may have drawn this sketch on site. At that time wild horses were said to be rampant on the Texas prairies. The drawing served as a study for another Ranney painting, Hunting Wild Horses, which is similar to The Lasso, but depicts more horses. | LR: R | Book: Forging an American Identity: The Art of William Ranney, With A Catalog Of His Works; by Linda Bantel and Peter H. Hassrick; Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody Wyoming, 2006, page 190 | 22.99.2.jpg | 22.99.2.jpg | wild | horse | Drawing | paper | heightened with white | black crayon | pencil | William Ranney (1813 - 1857) Study for Hunting Wild Horses ca. 1836-1846, pencil and black crayon heightened with white on paper Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran, 22.99.2 Ranney's sketch conveys the energy and power associated with wild horses. In 1836 when the artist was in Texas, he may have drawn this sketch on site. At that time wild horses were said to be rampant on the Texas prairies. The drawing served as a study for another Ranney painting, Hunting Wild Horses, which is similar to The Lasso, but depicts more horses. | Ranney, William

Prairie Burial
Ranney, William | Painting |...
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3.97 | 1848 | H: 28.5 in, width: 41 in, Frame height: 37 in, Frame width: 49.375 in, frame depth: 4.25 in | Prairie Burial | Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran | Prairie Burial represents a grieving family standing before a small grave. It serves as a reminder of the many children who died due to illness and accidents during the period of western expansion. | Verso, plaque on left side: Prairie Burial/ William Tylee Ranney/ 1813-1857 [labels at top left, on frame:][typed in red ink] William J. H(torn)ys - Wapiti oil/ Edward Eber(torn)dt and Sons. [label handwritten] WH (indecipherible)/ #3 Boxelle(indecipherible) [label at top right, on frame:] (typed in red ink) 143. William T. Ranney/ Prairie Burial/ oil / Maxwell Moran {label at top right, on stretcher] {hand printed on label with red border] #838 AMERICAN PIONEER LIFE/ A FRONTIER BURIAL/ BY WILLIAM S. (sic) RANNEY 1813-1857 / Signed & dated "Ranney 1842"(?)/ 28x41" inscribed on the stretcher, in black: W. (indecipherable) Esq. | Book: Forging an American Identity: The Art of William Ranney, With A Catalog Of His Works; by Linda Bantel and Peter H. Hassrick; Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody Wyoming, 2006, page 50 | 3.97.JPG | 3.97.jpg | 3.97.jpg | 3.97.web.jpg | settlers | burial | Painting | oil on canvas | William Ranney (1813 - 1857) Prairie Burial 1848, oil on canvas Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran, 3.97 The Prairie Burial chronicles the tragic aspects of western migration. Ranney's representation of a grieving family standing before a small grave serves as a reminder of the many children who died due to illness and accidents during the period of western expansion. | William Ranney (1813-1857) Prairie Burial 1848, oil on canvas Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran, 3.97 Prairie Burial represents a grieving family standing before a small grave. It serves as a reminder of the many children who died due to illness and accidents during the period of western expansion. | Ranney, William

The Trapper's Las...
Ranney, William | engraving ...
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11.16 | 1850 | Frame height: 25.75 in, Frame width: 31.75 in, frame depth: 1.5 in, H: 20.5 in, width: 26.5 in | The Trapper's Last Shot | Museum Purchase from William E. Weiss Memorial Fund | "Painted by WRanney" (Left corner, under print); "The Trapper's Last Shot" (center, under print); "Engraved by T.D. Booth CINNti" (right corner, under print) | This is a rare engraving of one of William Tylee Ranney's most popular images, The Trapper's Last Shot. The engraving was produced in 1850 by T. Dwight Booth for the Western Art-Union in Cincinnati. Booth's interpretation of Ranney's painting is almost identical in size to the original work. Two later versions of the engraving were distributed, one by J.M. Emerson and Company and another by Currier and Ives. The subject of the engraving is a mountain man in peril. An historical figure associated with the fur trade era in the West, the mountain man was celebrated by both artists and authors as an adventurous, entrepreneurial western hero. Notably, artist Charles Deas (1818-67) had propagated an idealized image of the mountain man in his 1844 painting, Long Jakes, "The Rocky Mountain Man". Ranney's character may be based on Joseph L. Meek (1810-75). ' | 1850 | 11.16.JPG | engraving on paper | T. Dwight Booth after William Tylee Ranney (1813-1857) The Trapper's Last Shot 1850, steel line engraving Museum Purchase from William E. Weiss Memorial Fund, 11.16 | Ranney, William