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Pioneer Mother (m...
Proctor, Alexander Phimister...
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11.06.692 | 1925-1927 | H: 30 in, width: 23 in, depth: 28 in | Pioneer Mother (mother) | Gift of A. Phimister Proctor Museum with special thanks to Sandy and Sally Church | The monumental Pioneer Mother was dedicated in 1925 in Kansas City to a reported crowd of nearly thirty thousand people. The viewers enthusiastically praised Proctor's ambitious pioneer sculpture group of three adults, a baby, and two horses. The powerful unity of the group, the forward motion, and the symbolic force of the mother impressed the audience at the dedication. In Proctor's own words, "It seemed to me that most people, in thinking of pioneers, thought solely of the men. I considered the heroism of the women equal to, and perhaps greater than, the men's." To give life to his sculpture, Proctor worked from models-people and animals. To create this sculpture group, Proctor moved his family to southern California because he was certain that western characters would be easier to find in Hollywood than anywhere else. He was correct. Proctor found models to pose for the figures and quickly finished the entire group. The actual monument in Kansas City is larger than these figures. This maquette was part of the enlarging process--one step prior to the full-size sculpture. | | 11.06.692.jpg | child | mothers | Sculpture | steel | plaster | Proctor, Alexander Phimister

Untitled, Indian ...
Fell, Olive | Painting | mix...
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18.99.3 | ca. 1970 | H: 6 in, width: 4.5 in | Untitled, Indian child | Gift of Hank and Florence Dais | on verso, paper label, typed: The little Mexican children/ were painted by Olive Fell/ in the early 1970's. She/ was traveling in New Mexico,/ and she became enchanted/ with the children. | not signed | 18.99.3.jpg | child | Indian | Painting | mixed media on board | Fell, Olive

The Broken Bow
Sharp, Joseph Henry | Painti...
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7.75 | ca. 1912 | sight height: 44.5 in, sight width: 59.375 in, Frame height: 55.375 in, Frame width: 70.25 in, frame depth: 4 in | The Broken Bow | Museum Purchase | In Montana Sharp lived in a log cabin; in New Mexico he lived in an adobe house and used an abandoned chapel for his studio. He probably painted this work in his Taos studio but posed his models wearing Plains Indian clothing. Sharp's Montana cabin has been moved to the museum's grounds and can be seen in the garden between the Whitney Gallery and the Cody Firearms Museum. | LL: J.H. Sharp | Acoustiguide. Title written in pencil | 7.75.jpg | 7.75.JPG | 7.75.jpg | 7.75.jpg | 7.75.jpg | 7.75.web.jpg | bow and arrow | Indian | child | son | Group | father | Painting | oil on canvas | Joseph Henry Sharp (1859-1953) The Broken Bow ca. 1912, oil on canvas Museum Purchase Sharp is remembered for his paintings of Indians in tranquil settings. Here, he depicts an intimate scene of a father and son. Sharp often mixed items from different Indian cultures to create a pleasing composition. For instance, notice the Plains Indian accessories on the figures placed in a pueblo setting. 7.75 | Joseph Henry Sharp (1859-1953) The Broken Bow ca. 1912, oil on canvas Museum Purchase A very nice painting of a father and son sharing and learning. Sweet. Great colors. A nice look at the personal life of all the Indians. I know he ordered the frame special for this painting but personally, I don’t care for western art in gold frames. The frame is really beautiful but a nice wooden frame to me just fits better. - Lee, studio art class student 7.75 | Joseph Henry Sharp (1859-1953) The Broken Bow ca. 1912, oil on canvas Museum Purchase I love this piece. This painting tells an age-old story of the next generation learning from the previous one. Besides the story, if you look at this painting from different angles, the people in the painting seem to move. It is one of the most unique paintings I have ever viewed. It has movement. -Sandy, Buffalo Bill Center of the West gallery guard 7.75 | Sharp, Joseph Henry

Mandan Mother and...
Bosin, Blackbear | Painting ...
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13.74 | ca. 1963 | H: 28.375 in, width: 39.875 in, Frame height: 38.375 in, Frame width: 48.5 in | Mandan Mother and Child | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wallick in memory of Wallace C. Ford | Bosin, a Comanche-Kiowa artist, was self-taught but influenced by the Kiowa Five artists. He painted in a flat, decorative style, known today as "traditional Indian painting." He researched tribal histories and was especially fascinated by the Mandan, who were nearly exterminated by smallpox in the 1830s, and portrayed their earth lodges in this painting. | LR: Blackbear Bosin | LR: Blackbear Bosin | 13.74.jpg | mother | child | earth lodge | Landscape | Mandan | Painting | gouache on illustration board | Bosin, Blackbear

Indian Mother and...
Jackson, Harry | Sculpture |...
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19.91 | 1980 | H: 31.25 in, width: 36.25 in, depth: 29.75 in | Indian Mother and Child | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Cashman | This sculpture derived from the artist's work on the monumental sculpture of Sacagawea, done for a sculpture garden at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center. The historical person of Sacagawea, who traveled with Lewis and Clark, blended several roles--helpmate to the explorers, mother to her young child, victim who is restored to her family. The conflation of these roles may help to explain why Scagawea is one of the most often portrayed women in American art. | L side of sculpture: (in the outline of a box) WFS/ITALY/SBU/3 P/(inside a circle) c Harry Jackson 1980/ (inside a circle) c Harry Jackson 1980 | 19.91.jpg | child | Sacagawea | Indian | Pompey Charbonneau | mother | Sculpture | wood | bronze | polychrome | Jackson, Harry

The Sanctity of M...
Leigh, William R. | Painting...
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20.91 | 1920 | H: 40.25 in, width: 59.875 in, Frame height: 48.375 in, Frame width: 68.625 in | The Sanctity of Motherhood | Gift of Larry and Betty Lou Sheerin | Leigh made sketching trips through New Mexico and Arizona. The image of mother and child carries many associations such as the continuation of human life through new generations, devotion, tenderness. Leigh identifies it as a blessed relationship by linking an Indian mother and child with the specific religious figure of Jesus. | LRC: W.R. LEIGH/c | Hudson Valley Art Association Gold Medal Award | 20.91.jpg | 20.91.jpg | 20.91.JPG | Indian | mother | child | Jesus | Painting | oil on canvas | Leigh, William R.

Home on the Range
Rudolph, Jeffrey B. | Sculpt...
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18.95.1 | 1995 | H: 26.25 in, width: 16.5 in, depth: 9.75 in, overall height: 38.25 in, overall width: 16.5 in, overall depth: 13.375 in | Home on the Range | William E. Weiss Purchase Award - 1995 Buffalo Bill Art Show | plaque on wooden base: HOME ON THE RANGE/ Rudolph | 18.95.1.2.JPG | cowgirl | child | Sculpture | alabaster | Rudolph, Jeffrey B.