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Whitney Western Art Museum Acoustiguide Tour

Join us for a tour of some of the highlights of the Whitney Western Art Museum.

A Buffalo Bill Center of the West Virtual Exhibit
Curated by: NancyM


The Golden Gate, ...
Moran, Thomas | Painting | o...
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4.75 | 1893 | H: 36.25 in, width: 50.25 in, Frame height: 46.5 in, Frame width: 60.5 in, frame depth: 4 in | The Golden Gate, Yellowstone National Park | Museum purchase | Moran's name became synonymous with Yellowstone. He accompanied the official governmental expedition into the region in 1871. His sketches of the wonders helped to convince Congress to establish Yellowstone as the first national park. The artist returned to the Park in 1892 and painted a view of the pass named Golden Gate. | LRC: TMoran./1893 | Book: Exhibition catalog; America! Storie di pittura dal Nuovo Mondo; linead'ombralibri, Treviso, Italy; 2007; page 64-65 | 4.75.jpg | 4.75.jpg | 4.75.JPG | 4.75.jpg | 4.75.jpg | 4.75.web.jpg | transportation | Figure | Landscape | Group | Animal | Painting | oil on canvas | Thomas Moran (1837-1926) Golden Gate, Yellowstone National Park 1893, oil on canvas Museum purchase Thomas "Yellowstone" Moran was the artist's nickname because of his close ties to Yellowstone National Park. He joined an official government expedition to the region in 1871. The artist returned to the Park in 1892 and painted a view of the pass named Golden Gate. 4.75 | Born in England, Thomas Moran created thousands of oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, and prints of the American West. The artist accompanied Ferdinand V. Hayden’s 1871 survey of the Yellowstone region and catapulted to fame the following year when Congress purchased his monumental painting The Grand Cañon of the Yellowstone, 1872. Twenty years later Moran returned to Yellowstone to paint the dramatic landscapes that had made him famous. This view of the passage known as the Golden Gate highlights a new trestle, built to accommodate the growing number of tourists drawn to America’s first national park. | Moran, Thomas

Yellowstone Falls
Bierstadt, Albert | Painting...
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2.63 | ca. 1881 | H: 44.25 in, width: 30.5 in, Frame height: 54 in, Frame width: 39.5 in, frame depth: 4.5 in | Yellowstone Falls | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Taggart | The author of one of the first guidebooks to Yellowstone National Park wrote that he "had the pleasure of sitting beside and conversing with the famous American artist, Bierstadt, as he was seated on a point in the Grand Canyon about 400 feet below the surface engaged in reproducing in oil, upon canvas, the Grand Canyon and Falls. It was indeed marvelous to see with what rapidity and accuracy these scenes were by him transferred to the canvas." | LLC: ABierstadt | Acoustiguide. | Magazine: Yellowstone Science; Volume 13, number 3, summer 2005; article: Yellowstone, Art, and the Emergence of Aesthetic Conservation by Peter H. Hassrick; U.S. Department of the Interior; page 9 | 2.63.jpg | 2.63.jpg | 2.63.JPG | 2.63.jpg | 2.63.web.jpg | Yellowstone Falls | Landscape | Painting | oil on canvas | Bierstadt, Albert

Lower Falls of th...
Wipfler, Kathy | Painting | ...
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10.07 | 2006 | sight height: 50 in, sight width: 50 in, Frame height: 57.375 in, Frame width: 57.375 in | Lower Falls of the Yellowstone | Gift of the Mary A. H. Rumsey Foundation | More than one hundred years after Thomas "Yellowstone" Moran memorialized the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River in the first monumental painting of the subject, Kathy Wipfler poised her canvas and paintbrush near the very spot where Moran stood. Yellowstone National Park has been an outdoor studio for generations of painters. Still today, artists travel to America's first national park to capture the unaltered beauty and wilderness. What was once a long and arduous journey to see the wonders of the landscape is now an easily accessible day trip on paved roadways and groomed walking paths. Wipfler painted the field sketch for this painting in late June of 2006 while tucked among trees off the beaten path of Artist Point. The large painting was completed later during the winter months in her studio in Jackson, Wyoming. Lower Falls of the Yellowstone is a colorful and fresh picture which captures the spirit of the landscape and awe-inspiring impression conveyed through the artist. | 10.07.jpg | 10.07.jpg | 10.07.web.jpg | Painting | oil on canvas | Kathy Wipfler (b. 1955) Lower Falls of the Yellowstone 2006, oil on canvas Gift of the Mary A.H. Rumsey Foundation, 10.07 | Wipfler, Kathy

Cutting Out
Wyeth, N.C. | Painting | oil...
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45.83 | 1904-1905 | H: 38 in, width: 25.875 in, Frame height: 46.25 in, Frame width: 34.125 in, frame depth: 3.5 in | Cutting Out | Gift of John M. Schiff | Wyeth wrote "Cutting out is a hard, wearisome task. There were some six thousand cattle in the herd that had been rounded up that morning, and it was the work of the men to weave through that mass and drive out certain brands..." | LRC: N.C. Wyeth/Colo.-1904- | quote was taken from article by N.C. Wyeth published in Scribner''s Magazine, vol. XXXIX, no. 3, March 1906, pages 285-290. | Catalog rasionne: N.C. Wyeth: Catlaog Raisonne of Paintings, Volume one, Christine B. Podmaniczky, Scala Publishers Limited, London 2008, pages 136-137 | 45.83.jpg | 45.83.jpg | 45.83.jpg | 45.83.JPG | Animal | Group | Cowboy | Painting | oil on canvas | N.C. Wyeth (1882-1945) Cutting Out (Colorado) 1904-1905, oil on canvas Gift of John M. Schiff In 1904, Wyeth made his first trip West. He worked for three weeks on a cattle roundup in Colorado. After Wyeth returned to Delaware, he completed a series of paintings about his experience. The artist portrayed lively scenes, sparking imaginations about what Western life was like in the early twentieth century. 45.83 | Wyeth, N.C.

The Broncho Buster
Remington, Frederic | Sculpt...
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7.74 | 1895 | H: 23.375 in, Base Width: 7.625 in, Base Length: 15.5 in | The Broncho Buster | Gift of G.J. Guthrie Nicholson Jr. and son in memory of their father/grandfather G.J. Guthrie Nicholson, rancher at Four Bear, Meeteetse, WY. | The Broncho Buster (1895) was Remington's first experiment in bronze. So vital and energetic was the piece and so untraditional in its approach, it won him immediate recognition as a sculptor and helped him enter the formal ranks of American artists of the day. Remington was enthusiastic about the potential for scupture and wrote to Owen Wister in 1895, "All other forms of art are trivialities-mud-or its sequence 'bronze' is a thing to think of when you are doing it-and afterwards too. It dont decay. The moth dont break through & steal-the rust & the idiot can not harm it." | Bottom Right of Base: Copyrighted by /Frederic Remington 1895. Top Left of Base: Frederic Remington, Bottom Left of Base: Roman Bronze Works Cire Perdue Cast NY (SEAL) | Small version of The Bronco Buster | 7.74.jpg | 7.74.JPG | 7.74.web.jpg | 7.74.jpg | 7.74.jpg | Cowboy | Animal | Sculpture | bronze | Remington, Frederic

Rough Rider
Proctor, Alexander Phimister...
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11.06.737 | 1920-1922 | H: 51 in, width: 26 in, depth: 21 in | Rough Rider | Gift of A. Phimister Proctor Museum with special thanks to Sandy and Sally Church | Proctor's monumental sculpture of Theodore Roosevelt embodies the honor and spirit of man and horse. Modeled and dedicated after the former president's life, the sculpture contributed to Proctor's national recognition as an artist. The grandson of Proctor found this life-size plaster cast of the sculpture in the North Dakota Historical Society, where it had been placed in the early 1920s. Newly restored, the plaster provides insight into the complicated process of creating a monumental sculpture. Fifteen plaster pieces formed the final working model before the sculpture was cast into bronze. Note the steel and plaster frame on the inside of the horse's body (just the rear of the horse weighs over 500 pounds!). Assistants helped Proctor enlarge the sculpture from a small version (seen left) to a medium version, to the final larger-than-life-size clay version. The sculptor added details and refined the work at each stage. Proctor had close associations with Roosevelt in his lifetime and created two sculptures for the State Dining Room at the White House while Roosevelt was president. After Roosevelt died, Proctor reminisced, "I recalled the pangs I had felt when he organized the Rough Riders. . . If I had not had a young wife and a newborn baby, I would certainly have joined him." | bust of Teddy Roosevelt; monumental sculpture covered in bronze paint; weight: 136 pounds; base: 140 pounds | 11.06.737.jpg | Man | Sculpture | steel | painted plaster | Proctor, Alexander Phimister

Lunch Hour
Russell, Charles M. | Sculpt...
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38.60 | unknown | H: 7.75 in, width: 7.75 in, depth: 4.25 in | Lunch Hour | Gift of Dr. Armand Hammer and Charles Stone Jones. | This wax sculpture recently received conservation treatment. The photograph shows the poor condition of Lunch Hour before treatment. The surface of the piece had developed a brown discharge that made it appear that the sculpture was melting. The conservation project revealed that the problems of the appearance of this sculpture were very complex. Russell made this sculpture suing a piece of found wood for the tree and beeswax to model the bear family. The sculpture was part of the Russell family collection and was never cast in bronze in Russell's lifetime. After the death of his wife, Nancy Cooper Russell, the bulk of their estate was acquired by a collector, H.E. Britzman, who had many of the wax sculptures cast into bronze. Research by Rick Stewart of the Amon Carter Museum uncovered documentation that Russell's waxes were altered during the casting process. The documentation included information about the original appearance of this sculpture. It showed that Russell had made the large bear's claws from pieces of tin and that the wood stump had deep hollow areas. These details are not evident in the bronze casts. Examination of the sculpture showed that material had been added to Russell's original sculpture. Plasticine, a modeling clay, was used to fill in parts of the sculpture, probably to make it easier to cast. Plasticine, a less stable material than beeswax, caused the brown discharge on the surface. Conservator Glenn Wharton, in consultation with Whitney Gallery curator Sarah Boehme and conservator Beverly Perkins, cleaned the sculpture by hand and with solvents where appropriate. The plasticine, which was not part of the original sculpture, was removed, revealing the tin claws, the shape of the wood, and Russell's delicate coloring. The work of art was restored to appear as close as possible to Russell's original conception. | Restrictions: Model not to be sold, loaned, used for the purpose of casting bronzes, or used for the making of any reproductions whatsoever. Source: Charles Jones (1/4 interest, 1959) and Armand Hammer (3/4 interest, 12-63) | 38.60.jpg | 38.60.jpg | 38.60.JPG | Sculpture | wax | mixed media | Charles Russell (1864-1926) Lunch Hour date unknown, wax and mixed media Gift of Dr. Armand Hammer and Charles Stone Jones, 38.60 Russell's wax models reveal an inventive and playful side to the artist. Russell made Lunch Hour using a piece of wood he found for the tree and beeswax to model the bear family. He then added other material for details, such as pieces of tin for the large bear claws. | Russell, Charles M.

The Last of Their...
Stanley, John Mix | Painting...
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5.75 | 1857 | H: 43 in, width: 60 in, Frame height: 52.125 in, Frame width: 68.5 in, frame depth: 3 in | The Last of Their Race | Museum Purchase | An allegory on the theme of the Indian as a dying race, this painting depicts remnants of the tribes pushed to the edge of the ocean with the sun setting in the distance and buffalo skulls forecasting the end. Stanley arranged his representatives of the tribes and ages in a pyramid, giving a classical composition to his painting. | LLC: J. M. Stanley/1857 | Book: Henry Farny Paints the Far West by Susan Labry Meyn; Cincinnati Art Museum; Cincinnati; 2007; page 24 | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.JPG | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.web.jpg | Animal | Group | Indian | Landscape | Painting | oil on canvas | John Mix Stanley (1814-1872) Last of Their Race 1857, oil on canvas 5.75 This painting is an allegory of the Indian as a dying race. Stanley portrayed the tribes being pushed to the edge of the ocean , the sun setting in the distance, and buffalo skulls forecasting the end. | John Mix Stanley (1814-1872) The Last of Their Race 1857, oil on canvas Museum Purchase, 5.75 This painting reveals a veiled symbolic message. Its title and composition echo the common sentiment that America's Indian tribes were doomed to disappear in the face of Euro-American's westward expansion. In Stanley's depiction, the group has quite literally been pushed to the brink of extinction on America's westernmost shore. | Stanley, John Mix

Advice on the Pra...
Ranney, William | Painting |...
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10.91 | 1853 | H: 38.75 in, width: 55.25 in, Frame height: 45.625 in, Frame width: 61.325 in, frame depth: 3.125 in | Advice on the Prairie | Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran | Ranney painted "genre" paintings, scenes of everyday life on the American frontier. In this painting he portrayed a group of Western immigrants, including a family, camped with their wagon for the evening. They listen to tales of what they will encounter from a mountain man, the representative of an earlier period of frontier history. | LR, in script: W. Ranney./..53 | Magazine: Cowboys & Indians: 15 Paintings: The Story of the Amercian West has been Told in Blood, Sweat, Tears-and Paint by Emily Sachar, USFR Media Group, October 2008, page 130. | 10.91.jpg | 10.91.v1.jpg | 10.91.jpg | 10.91.JPG | 10.91.v1.jpg | 10.91.v1.jpg | 10.91.v1.web.jpg | Prairie | pioneers | covered | wagon | Painting | oil on canvas | William Ranney (1813 - 1857) Advice on the Prairie 1853, oil on canvas Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran,10.91 Ranney painted "genre" paintings, scenes of everyday life on the American frontier. In this painting he portrayed a group of Western immigrants, including a family, camped with their wagon for the evening. They listen to tales of what they will encounter from a mountain man, the representative of an earlier period of frontier history. | William Ranney was best known for his scenes of everyday life on the American frontier. In this painting he portrayed a group of Western immigrants, including a family with young children, camped with their wagon for the evening. They listen intently to tales of what they might encounter on their journey from a seated scout, who represents an earlier era of frontier history. The young woman standing to the rear cradling an infant represents the “Prairie Madonna,” who personified manifest destiny and the idea that Euro-American populations had a divine right to settle the West. | Ranney, William

Madonna of the Pr...
Koerner, W.H.D. | Painting |...
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25.77 | 1921 | H: 37 in, width: 28.75 in, Frame height: 43.5 in, Frame width: 35.5 in, frame depth: 3.5 in | Madonna of the Prairie | Museum purchase | In the novel The Covered Wagon, Molly Wingate traveled the Oregon Trail with a wagon train of settlers. Encountering prairie fires and Indian arrows, the beautiful maiden eventually reached Oregon, where, in the conventions of popular fiction, she found true love. In this illustration for the novel's book jacket, Koerner used the covered wagon to form a halo around the pioneer's head. | LR: WHD/Koerner/1921 | see ARGUS record SEP.V194.40.1922, The Saturday Evening Post, April 1, 1922. Madonna of the Prairie was used as the cover illustration. | Book: exhibition catalog, La Mythologie De L' Ouest, Dans L'Art Americain 1830-1940, Laurent Salome, editor, Silvana Editoriale, Milan, 2007, page 89 | 25.77.jpg | 25.77.JPG | 25.77.jpg | 25.77.web.jpg | 25.77.jpg | 25.77.jpg | covered wagon | woman | Painting | oil on canvas | Koerner, W.H.D.

The Last of the B...
Bierstadt, Albert | Painting...
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2.60 | ca. 1888 | H: 60.25 in, width: 96.5 in, Frame height: 68.5 in, Frame width: 105.5 in | The Last of the Buffalo | Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney Trust Fund Purchase | With bleeding buffalo and bleached skulls in the foreground, the landscape artist Bierstadt represented the theme of wildlife vanishing from the wilderness. He made the shapes of distant mountains repeat the shapes of the main figures, thus underlining the interdependent relationships in nature. The Last of the Buffalo implies other endings. | LLC: ABierstadt | Book: Redrawing Boundaries: Perspectives on Western American Art; Institute of Western American Art, Denver; and the University of Washington Press, Seattle; 2007, page 75 | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.JPG | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.web.jpg | Animal | hunting | Indian | Other | Painting | oil on canvas | Bierstadt, Albert

I-80 Energy Romance
Stinson, Don | Painting | oi...
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15.13 | 2013 | Frame height: 29 in, Frame width: 64.875 in, H: 28 in, width: 64 in | I-80 Energy Romance | Gift of The Alexander Bodini Foundation, in memory of Alexander Bodini | Don Stinson's paintings are panoramas of the American West of today. The magnificent landscapes are beautifully painted, especially the skies that reach into the distance. Stinson typically includes aspects of our built environment of the recent past - an abandoned gas station or drive-in* movie theater, for example. In the context of the western land, these human elements seem temporary and fleeting, as if being re-claimed by nature. While there are layers of meaning in the paintings, the images are immediately recognizable and familiar to anyone who has ever driven distances in the American West. 1-80 Energy Romance is relevant to Wyoming culture, especially in the ways it addresses the state's interest in and reliance upon energy. Stinson's paintings are in the collection of the Denver Art Museum and Phoenix Art Museum. He has been featured in major art exhibitions across the country. He is currently at the height of his career and is an excellent addition to the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. | 15.13.jpg | 15.13v1.jpg | Painting | oil on linen | Stinson, Don

Tumbleweeds
Aspevig, Clyde | Painting | ...
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16.99 | 1999 | H: 40 in, width: 60.25 in, Frame height: 45.25 in, Frame width: 65.25 in | Tumbleweeds | Gift of the Mary A.H. Rumsey Foundation | The sagebrush and wide-open horizons of Wyoming and Montana serve as inspiration for Aspevig. Tumbleweeds features a typical sagebrush steppe envrionment and Heart Mountain, a prominent landmark near Cody, Wyoming. | verso, UL, stretcher, in script: Fredrix/ 60/ CLYDE ASPEVIG/ P.O. BOX 347/ CLYDE PARK, MT 59018 | LLC: C. ASPEVIG | 16.99.jpg | 16.99.web.jpg | 16.99.jpg | Landscape | Painting | oil on canvas | Aspevig, Clyde

Indian Warrior
Proctor, Alexander Phimister...
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4.08.2 | 1896-1899 | width: 30.5 in, depth: 10.5 in, H: 38.625 in, L: 37.1875 in, Diameter: .25 in, L: 3.625 in, L: 1.1875 in, L: 17.75 in | Indian Warrior | Gift of A. Phimister Proctor Museum with special thanks to Sandy and Sally Church | Proctor portrayed his subject in a heroic pose, mounted on horseback as military leaders have traditionally been depicted. To research Indian subjects the artist traveled to the Blackfeet reservation in Montana. Although Weasel Head, a Blackfeet, served as the final model for this figure, the sculpture is not a specific portrait. Proctor created an idealized image of the Indian as a proud and noble warrior. | left top back of base: APHIMISTER PROCTOR/ 1898/ GOLD MEDAL/ PARIS EXPOSITION/ 1900 [right top of base:] COPY RT 1899 [lower right edge of base:] GORHAM Co. FOUNDERS/ (box)/ QRM [left rear of base:] PALLO | The spear on the sculpture is a reproduction .Weiss notified the BBHC by a letter dated June 15, 2005 that he sold the bronze to Mr. & Mrs. Phimister P. Church. | l.18.94.2.jpg | 4.08.2.jpg | horse | Indian | Sculpture | bronze | Alexander Phimister Proctor (1860 - 1950) Indian Warrior modeled 1898, copyright 1899, cast initially 1900-1902; bronze, cast by Gorham Co. Founders Loan from A. Phimister Proctor Museum, L.258.2005.1 Proctor portrayed his subject in a heroic pose, mounted on horseback as military leaders have traditionally been depicted. To research Indian subjects the artist traveled to the Blackfeet reservation in Montana. Although Weasel Head, a Blackfeet, served as the final model for this figure, the sculpture is not a specific portrait. Proctor created an idealized image of the Indian as a proud and noble warrior. | Alexander Phimister Proctor portrayed his subject in a heroic pose, mounted on horseback, as military leaders have traditionally been depicted. The artist traveled to the Blackfeet reservation in Montana to research his subjects, and although an Indian named Weasel Head served as the model for this figure, the sculpture is not intended as a specific portrait. Proctor created an idealized image of the American Indian as a proud and noble warrior, blending European artistic traditions with a wholly American subject. | Proctor, Alexander Phimister

Indian With Tomah...
Scholder, Fritz | Painting |...
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15.77 | 1970 | H: 58.25 in, width: 58.25 in, Frame height: 59.5 in, Frame width: 59.5 in | Indian With Tomahawk | William E. Weiss Contemporary Art Fund Purchase | Fritz Scholder created a series of Indian paintings in the years 1967 through 1980. He did not adhere to the traditional, idealized interpretation of the Indian as the noble savage. Instead, Scholder sought new and innovative pictorial representations to convey the harsher realities of the Indian world. As seen in this painting, the artist used bold, unnatural colors and distorted the image with loose painterly brushwork to create his personal vision of Indian reality. | Upper left: Scholder; Upper left reverse: -Indian with Tomahawk-1970/Oil on canvas | 15.77.jpg | 15.77.JPG | 15.77.JPG | Indian | Painting | oil on canvas | Scholder, Fritz

The Trail Driver
Jackson, Harry | Painting | ...
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49.59 | 1956 | sight height: 84.25 in, sight width: 44 in, Frame height: 92 in, Frame width: 52 in | The Trail Driver | Gift of the artist | Jackson painted The Trail Driver at the Pitchfork Ranch in Meeteetse, Wyoming. During a trip to Europe he was inspired by the portraits of nobility by artists such as Diego Velazquez of Spain. Jackson wanted to celebrate the American cowboy with a similar heroic vision. | ULC: Harry Jackson/1956 | 494.59.JPG | 49.59.jpg | Cowboy | Painting | oil on canvas | Jackson, Harry

Custer's Last Stand
Paxson, Edgar Samuel | Paint...
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19.69 | 1899 | H: 70.5 in, width: 106 in, Frame height: 98 x 73.75 in, Frame width: 132.75 x 108.75 in, frame depth: 2 in | Custer's Last Stand | Museum purchase | Paxson researched the Battle of the Little Bighorn and spent several years completing the painting. He then circulated it as a traveling exhibition. As part of the explanatory material on the painting, he prepared an outline key which identified the major figures (see diagram at right). | LRC: copyright by/E.S. Paxson Butte/M./99 [verso, LL:] E.S. Paxson/Butte Mont. U.S.A./copyright applied for - | Source: Paxson Heirs | Magazine: Western Art & Architecture: From Cowboy to Contemporary; Perspective: Edgar S. Paxson: Painter, myth maker aspired to historical accuracy, Charles Finn, Winter/Spring 2008, page 72-73 | 19.69.JPG | 19.69.web.jpg | 19.69.jpg | 19.69.jpg | 19.69.jpg | 19.69.jpg | Group | Figure | Indian | military | Animal | Painting | oil on canvas | Paxson, Edgar Samuel

The Battle of Gre...
Mardon, Allan | Painting | w...
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6.01 | 1931 - | H: 76 in, width: 136 in | The Battle of Greasy Grass | Museum Purchase with funds from the William E. Weiss Memorial Fund, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon H. Barrows, and the Franklin A. West Memorial Fund | The events of the two-day "Battle of Greasy Grass" near Hardin, Montana unfold in Mardon's artistic reconstruction of historic facts. The artist's unique style is marked by an expressive utilization of stylized figures rendered in rich, intense colors. Mardon studied historical accounts prior to composing the work, and describes the painting as "an artistic, not a literal, representation of the events and movements of troops and is not to scale." His style is influenced by both Indian hide paintings and ledger art. | UL: CEMETARY RIDGE; UC: KEOGH 500/NYE-CARTRIGHT RIDGE; UR: THE BATTLE OF GREASY GRASS/THE LITTLE BIG HORN/SUNDAY/JUNE/2th5 1876/SHARPSHOOTER'S RIDGE/RENO HILL/440/700; center: 5:20/5:20/CUSTER HILL/CALHOUN HILL L/4:30/DEEP RAVINE/DEEP COULEE/MEDICINE TAIL COULEE/WEIR POINT 5:35; CR:WATER CARRIER'S RAVINE/H/D/K; LL: GREASY GRASS/BRULE/SANS ARC/MINNECONJOU/CHEYENNE/OGLALLA/BLACKFEET/HUNKPAPA; LR: Allan Mardon '96 | BBHC Cody Enterprise column: “Your Museum Matters” – July 1, 2009 From our collection: Contemporary artist Allan Mardon brings vibrant color and stylized figures to “The Battle of Greasy Grass” (aka Little Bighorn). Influenced by Native American accounts of the battle, Indian hide paintings, and ledger art, Mardon says the work is “an artistic, not a literal, representation of the events and movements of troops.” The painting recounts the battle from multiple perspectives and times, with Sitting Bull, for example, appearing in four different locations to show his movements through the course of the two-day battle. In the redesigned Whitney Gallery of Western Art, Mardon’s work is accompanied by an interactive touch screen computer that lets visitors explore details of the painting and the history of its subject. The painting’s placement in the gallery juxtaposes it with the historic Edgar Paxson painting Custer’s Last Stand, painted almost one hundred years earlier. Credit: Allan Mardon (b. 1931). The Battle of Greasy Grass, 1996. Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, Wyoming. Museum Purchase with funds from William E. Weiss Memorial Fund, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon H. Barrows, and the Franklin A. West Memorial Fund. 6.01 | 6.01.jpg | 6.01.jpg | 6.01c.jpg | 6.01l.jpg | 6.01r.jpg | 6.01.jpg | 6.01.web.jpg | Painting | wooden frame with painted tin figures | oil on linen | Mardon, Allan

A Contemporary Si...
Bama, James | Painting | oil...
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19.78 | 1978 | H: 23.375 in, W: 35.375 in, Frame height: 34.5 in, Frame width: 46.625 in | A Contemporary Sioux Indian | William E. Weiss Contemporary Art Fund Purchase | In western art the Indian is often portrayed as a character from the past. Using a realist style, Bama portrayed a contemporary Indian who maintains a relationship with the past but has to find his place in the white man's world. The message on the wall behind the subject echoes the artist's theme of the nonacceptance of Indians in mainstream American society. | LL: Bama 78 | 19.78.jpg | 19.78.jpg | 19.78.JPG | Indian | Painting | oil on panel | Bama, James

Buffalo Bill - Th...
Whitney, Gertrude Vanderbilt...
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3.58 | 1924 | H: 149 in, width: 84 in, L: 138 in | Buffalo Bill - The Scout | Gift of the artist | Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (Not dated but completed in 1924), Roman Bronze Works N.Y. plinth: BUFFALO BILL / MDCCCXLVI - MCMXVII | Acoustiguide. Source: Gift of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney as part of 2 commissions from the trustees of the Buffalo Bill Memorial Association. Provenance: Gift (and partial purchase) from the artist. A rowel stolen off of the sculpture years ago was returned in 1994. The rowel is in VB.C7.S1. | BBHC Cody Enterprise column: “Your Museum Matters” – May 1, 2009 From our collection: In 1922, the Buffalo Bill Memorial Association commissioned a New York artist, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, to create a monument to Buffalo Bill in Cody, Wyoming. Not only did she create a masterpiece, she also gave generously. In 1924, she donated Buffalo Bill – The Scout, and forty acres of adjacent land, to the association, and the statue was dedicated July 4, 1924. For 30 years, the Scout remained a solitary figure at the outskirts of town. Then, in 1954, Whitney’s son, Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney, contributed a sizeable donation in his mother’s memory, creating the Whitney Gallery of Western Art which opened in 1959. When the Whitney Gallery reopens on June 21, 2009, visitors will now be able to see the Scout through the entire length of the gallery. Credit Line/caption: Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875 – 1942). Buffalo Bill – The Scout, 1924. Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, Wyoming. Gift of the artist. 3.58 | 3.58.jpg | 3.58.jpg | 3.58v2.jpg | 3.58.2014pic.JPG | 3.58.JPG | 3.58.web.jpg | William F. Cody | military | horse | Sculpture | bronze | Whitney, Gertrude Vanderbilt

Col. William F. C...
Bonheur, Rosa | Painting | o...
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8.66 | 1889 | H: 18.5 in, width: 15.25 in, Frame height: 24 in, Frame width: 21 in, frame depth: 2.5 in | Col. William F. Cody | Given in memory of William R. Coe and Mai Rogers Coe | Buffalo Bill enthralled Europeans with his Wild West exhibition when he took it to Paris in 1889. Bonheur visited the grounds of Cody's Wild West to sketch the exotic American animals and the Indian warriors with their families. Cody, in turn, accepted the invitation of Rosa Bonheur to visit her chateau in Fontainebleau where she painted this portrait. For Rosa Bonheur, Buffalo Bill embodied the freedom and independence of the United States | LLC: "Rosa Bonheur/ -1889-" | Acoustiguide. | Book: Iconic America: A Roller-Coaster Ride Through the Eye-popping Panorama of American Pop Culture; by Tommy Hilfiger with George Lois; Universe Publishing, a division of Rizzoli International Publications, Inc.; New York, 2007, page 99 (detail) | 8.66.jpg | 8.66.jpg | 8.66.jpg | 8.66.JPG | 8.66.jpg | 8.66.web.jpg | Figure | Landscape | Animal | Buffalo Bill | Painting | oil on canvas | Bonheur, Rosa

Prairie Rattler
Coen, Don | Painting | acryl...
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10.11 | 1981-1982 | sight height: 78.25 in, sight width: 95.75 in, Frame height: 88 in, Frame width: 97.5 in, frame depth: 2.675 in | Prairie Rattler | Gift of The Alexander Bodini Foundation, in memory of Alexander Bodini | This painting was a part of the original Lamar Series according to an email from the artist. | artist signature at lower right | 10.11.jpg | rattlesnake | Painting | acrylic on canvas | Coen, Don

The Menagerie
Scott, Michael | Painting | ...
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2.12 | 2007-2011 | H: 90.5 in, width: 61.75 in | The Menagerie | Gift of The Alexander Bodini Foundation in memory of Alexander Bodini | Michael Scott is a contemporary artist who currently lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Scott finds inspiration for this subjects and style in history, art history, and the western landscape and people near his home. In "The Menagerie", Scott imagines Buffalo Bill as the caretaker for an exotic bird menagerie. Symbolism for each bird references the personality of Buffalo Bill, who stands as the "ring leader" of the birds in the painting. The peacock, for example, is associated with vanity and therefore reflects one quality of Buffalo Bill. But in addition, the peacock is difficult bird to manage, and the way in which Buffalo Bill controls the bird is a reflection of his stature and calm. Scott also positions Buffalo Bill and the birds on a stage-set surrounded by curtains. Many interpretations can be teased from this setting: Buffalo Bill pulling back the curtain behind his performances; or art and painting as a literal flat surface of paint, rather than a window into reality (pulling back the curtain on art). In addition, the composition and subject reference a major American 18th century painting by Charles Wilson Peale that depicted a self-portrait of the artist in his museum (the first museum in the United States). | signature, lower left: Michael Scott | 2.12.jpg | Buffalo Bill | peacock | birds | Painting | oil on canvas | Scott, Michael

Western Man with ...
Roll-preissler, Audrey | Scu...
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2.89 | 1984-1985 | H: 88.75 in, L: 48.5 in, width: 48.5 in | Western Man with Beer and Dog | Gift of Mrs. Henry Oliver, Jr. | Western art, especially from the time of Charles M. Russell, has a strong tradition of including humor. Roll-preissler takes a contemporary tone in mocking the commercialization associated with the modern cowboy image. Using caricature in her painting style, she emphasizes the idea of superficiality with the cut-our sculpture (a two-dimensional figure lacks depth). | A. roll-preissler, Front left: A. roll-preissler | Acoustiguide. Provenance: Conversation with artist on materials. Plywood - 5/8 AB plywood, primed with latex primer, latex extender, spackle, latex paint, empty Marlboro box, corduroy - 60% polyester, 40% cotton. Wood collected North of Lander, Wyoming (not treated), jeans - 100% cotton, Skoal can, Base - plywood, Coors beer can, steel braces. Two cowboys who worked for her husband posed for it, but she used her husband's face for the figure | 2.89.JPG | Animal | Cowboy | Sculpture | mixed media on wood | Audrey Roll-preissler (b. 1932) Western Man with Beer and Dog 1984-1985, mixed media Gift of Mrs. Henry Oliver, Jr. This life-like modernistic presentation is like a magazine ad jumping out of the page. -George, Buffalo Bill Center of the West docent 2.89 | Audrey Roll-preissler (b. 1932) Western Man with Beer and Dog 1984-1985, mixed media Gift of Mrs. Henry Oliver, Jr. I believe this piece has a somewhat comical side to what is usually depicted as the serious more stern side to the cowboy life. It shows a dog that a cowboy wouldn’t generally have. I also like the beer can and cigarettes. I think it gives the piece more character. -Greybull High School art class student 2.89 | Audrey Roll-preissler (b. 1932) Western Man with Beer and Dog 1984-1985, mixed media Gift of Mrs. Henry Oliver, Jr. Western art has a tradition of including humor. In this sculpture, Roll-preissler mocks the modern cowboy image used in advertising. To emphasize her point, the artist reduced the cowboy to a shallow, two-dimensional caricature. 2.89 | Roll-preissler, Audrey