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Cowboy

A Buffalo Bill Center of the West Virtual Exhibit
Curated by: Alyssa


Bronco Buster
Russell, Charles M. | Painti...
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58.72 | 1915 | sight height: 11 in, sight width: 16.625 in, Frame height: 20.75 in, Frame width: 26.5 in, mat width: 21.875 in, mat height: 16.25 in, frame depth: 1.75 in | Bronco Buster | Gift of William E. Weiss | Semi-broken horses or "broncs," required considerable "unlimbering" by their riders. The bronco buster-a person who breaks wild horses-had the daunting task of mastering the full repertoire of tricks the horse was capable of inflicting. The theme of subjugation flourished in late 19th and early 20th century Western American art, and works that captured the taming of wild horses often served as a metaphor for the taming of the West itself. | LL: C M Russell/(skull)/1915/c. | Restrictions: May not be sold or traded under any circumstances. | 58.72.JPG | 58.72.jpg | 58.72.jpg | 58.72.web.jpg | Animal | Cowboy | Landscape | Painting | watercolor on paper | Russell, Charles M.

"Bucking"
Wyeth, N.C. | Painting | oil...
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2.77 | 1904-1905 | H: 38 in, width: 26.125 in, Frame height: 46.125 in, Frame width: 34 in | "Bucking" | Gift of John M. Schiff | N.C. Wyeth headed a family of three generations of artists. He was the father of Henriette and Andrew Wyeth and grandfather of James Wyeth. Henriette married one of her father's pupils, artist Peter Hurd. | LL: N. C. Wyeth/Jim's Canyon Colo./-1904- | Catalog rasionne: N.C. Wyeth: Catlaog Raisonne of Paintings, Volume one, Christine B. Podmaniczky, Scala Publishers Limited, London 2008, pages 136-137 | 2.77.JPG | 2.77.jpg | 2.77.jpg | Animal | Landscape | Cowboy | Painting | oil on canvas | N.C. Wyeth (1882-1945) Bucking (Jim’s Canyon Colo.) 1904-1905, oil on canvas Gift of John M. Schiff N.C. Wyeth headed a family of three generations of artists. He was the father of Henriette and Andrew Wyeth and grandfather of James Wyeth. Henriette married one of her father’s pupils, artist Peter Hurd. 2.77 | N. C. Wyeth made his first trip out West in 1904, even though he had already obtained several commissions for Western illustrations as a young art student. He worked for three weeks on a cattle roundup in Colorado, which provided the inspiration for a series of swashbuckling paintings about cowboys and life on the trail. Wyeth used these images to accompany “A Day at the Roundup,” a story he wrote for Scribner’s Magazine. | Wyeth, N.C.

Coming Through th...
Remington, Frederic | Sculpt...
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5.66 | 1907 | H: 27.5 in, Base Length: 28 in, Base Width: 19 in, overall length: 27.25 in, overall width: 31 in, overall height: 29 in | Coming Through the Rye | Gift of Barbara S. Leggett | Remington studied the movement of horses, using the photographs of Eadweard Muybridge, and incorporated his knowledge into this representation of cowboys coming to town for a raucous celebration. This sculpture challenged Remington because he wanted to raise as many of the horses' hooves off the ground as possible, while adequately supporting the sculpture. | Lower Right of Base: Copyrighted by Frederic Remington Lower Left of Base: Roman Bronze Works N.Y. Front Center Base - Gold Plaque: Presented to/Edmund Converse/by the directors of the/Liberty National Bank/New York 1907 [lower left of base in back;] 7 | 5.66.jpg | 5.66.JPG | 5.66.jpg | 5.66.web.jpg | Group | Animal | Cowboy | Sculpture | bronze | Frederic Remington (1861-1909) Coming Through the Rye modeled 1902, cast 1907, bronze cast number 7 Roman Bronze works, N.Y. Gift of Barbara S. Leggett 5.66 Remington creates energy, motion, and excitement in this sculpture. The rowdy cowboys barrel through town. The horses seem to defy gravity and run in midair. Remington pushes the limits of sculpture, lifting as many of the horses’ hooves off the ground as possible, while still supporting the weight. | Remington, Frederic

Corriente Gathering
Seabeck, Robert | Painting |...
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8.08 | 2008 | sight height: 12.25 in, sight width: 48.125 in, Frame height: 19.75 in, Frame width: 55.625 in, frame depth: 1.75 in | Corriente Gathering | William E. Weiss Purchase Award - 2008 Buffalo Bill Art Show | lower right of center: R. Seabeck | lower right of center: R. Seabeck | 8.08.jpg | Cowboy | longhorn | cattle | horse | Painting | oil on canvas | Robert Seabeck (b.1945) Corriente Gathering 2008, oil on canvas William E. Weiss Purchase Award–2008 Buffalo Bill Art Show Seabeck, a Wyoming artist, is familiar with the western lifestyle. For example, a cattle drive is not just an event of the Old West, but is current practice for living ranchers. The subject in art has long endured—as shown by the paintings here. 8.08 | Seabeck, Robert

Cowboy on Horseba...
Johnson, Frank Tenney | Pain...
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9.72 | H: 16 in, width: 12 in, Frame height: 18.125 in, Frame width: 14.125 in | Cowboy on Horseback (night) | back of frame: U.C.(upside down); dark mat . blue paper dot: 9 | probably an unfinished sketch | not signed, not dated | 9.72.jpg | Landscape | horse | night | Cowboy | Painting | oil on board | Johnson, Frank Tenney

Prospecting for C...
Remington, Frederic | Painti...
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85.60 | 1889 | H: 29.25 in, width: 50.25 in, Frame height: 39 in, Frame width: 59.875 in, frame depth: 3.75 in | Prospecting for Cattle Range | Gift of Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney | Especially in his early career as a painter, Remington took a number of opportunities to paint portraits of westerners at work. In 1889, Remington accepted a commission from Milton E. Milner to show him and an associate, Judge Kennon, out searching for new cattle range in Montana Territory. The commission provided a welcome opportunity for Remington to provide some pictorial insights into the cattle business, to paint horses and cowboys at work and to produce a double portrait all in the same picture. | LR: Frederic Remington/'89 | 85.60.jpg | 85.60.web.jpg | 85.60.jpg | 85.60.jpg | 85.60.JPG | 85.60.jpg | Cowboy | Milner, Milton E.,Kennon, Judge | Group | Animal | Landscape | Other | Portrait | Figure | Painting | oil on canvas | Frederic Remington (1861-1909) Prospecting for Cattle Range 1889, oil on canvas Gift of Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Remington rarely painted portraits, but this painting was an exception. He accepted a commission from Milton E. Milner to paint Montana cattle ranchers. The commission provided a welcome opportunity for Remington to portray the cattle business, to show horses and cowboys at work, and to produce a double portrait all in one picture. 85.60 | Early in his career, Frederic Remington took advantage of a number of opportunities to paint portraits of Westerners at work. In 1889, the artist accepted a commission from Milton E. Milner to depict him and an associate, Judge Kennon, out searching for new cattle range in Montana Territory. The commission provided a welcome opportunity for Remington to provide a pictorial insight into the cattle business, to paint horses and cowboys at work, and to produce a double portrait all in the same picture. | Remington, Frederic

Rodeo's Main Event
Scriver, Bob | Sculpture | b...
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9.88 | 1979 | H: 15.5 in, L: 13 in, width: 7.5 in, base depth: 1.75 in, Base Length: 12 in, Base Width: 8.5 in | Rodeo's Main Event | Gift of H. Peter Kriendler, Mrs. I. Robert Kriendler, Jerry Berns and Sheldon Tannen | Scriver has used the rodeo as the subject of many sculptures and has said, "I came to see that these people were real Americans - the last in the tradition of the Old West. They pay their own way, win, lose or draw, asking only for an even break." | Rear of base: c.(with a circle around it) BOB SCRIVER 1979, Front of base: RODEO'S MAIN EVENT, Left rear of base: BIG HORN/FOUNDRY, Stamped left rear of base: 21 (underlined over)100 | 9.88.JPG | Animal | Cowboy | Sculpture | bronze | Bob Scriver (1914-1999) Rodeo’s Main Event 1979, bronze cast number 21, edition of 100 Big Horn Foundry Gift of H. Peter Kriendler, Mrs. I. Robert Kriendler, Jerry Berns and Sheldon Tannen 9.88 Rodeo evolved from the cowboy culture of the Old West and celebrates the skills of the cowboy. For his sculpture series about the sport, the Rodeo Cowboy Association presented Scriver with the highest honor—a World Championship buckle. It was the first and only buckle ever presented to an artist. | Scriver, Bob

The Broncho Buster
Remington, Frederic | Sculpt...
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7.74 | 1895 | H: 23.375 in, Base Width: 7.625 in, Base Length: 15.5 in | The Broncho Buster | Gift of G.J. Guthrie Nicholson Jr. and son in memory of their father/grandfather G.J. Guthrie Nicholson, rancher at Four Bear, Meeteetse, WY. | The Broncho Buster (1895) was Remington's first experiment in bronze. So vital and energetic was the piece and so untraditional in its approach, it won him immediate recognition as a sculptor and helped him enter the formal ranks of American artists of the day. Remington was enthusiastic about the potential for scupture and wrote to Owen Wister in 1895, "All other forms of art are trivialities-mud-or its sequence 'bronze' is a thing to think of when you are doing it-and afterwards too. It dont decay. The moth dont break through & steal-the rust & the idiot can not harm it." | Bottom Right of Base: Copyrighted by /Frederic Remington 1895. Top Left of Base: Frederic Remington, Bottom Left of Base: Roman Bronze Works Cire Perdue Cast NY (SEAL) | Small version of The Bronco Buster | 7.74.jpg | 7.74.JPG | 7.74.web.jpg | 7.74.jpg | 7.74.jpg | Cowboy | Animal | Sculpture | bronze | Remington, Frederic

The Broncho Buste...
Remington, Frederic | Sculpt...
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7.60 | 1909 | H: 31.5 in, L: 20 in, width: 19 in, base depth: 1.625 in, Base Width: 13.75 in, Base Length: 18.375 in, weight: 0 lbs | The Broncho Buster (large) | Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney Trust Fund | Remington's sculpture representing a human struggle to control nature has become a classic symbol of the American West. The artist identified the subject as a cowboy "breaking a wild horse" in his copyright application for the first version of this sculpture. His twenty-three inch high bronze was so successful that the artist reworked the concept and modeled this larger version at the end of his life. | Right top of Base: Copyright BY/ Frederic Remington, Rear left side of Base: ROMAN BRONZE WORKS / N- Y-, Underneath Base N- 10 (inscribed) 644 | Has been called "recast" in the past. Existing crate: 38 1/4 x 24 1/2, 176# | 7.60.JPG | horse | Cowboy | Sculpture | bronze | Remington, Frederic

The Bucker and th...
Russell, Charles M. | Sculpt...
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9.81 | 1923-1924 | H: 14.75 in, Base Width: 8 in, Base Length: 10 in, width: 8 in, depth: 10.5 in | The Bucker and the Buckeroo | Gift of William E. Weiss | In a letter written about the time he modeled this sculpture, Russell said, "Bronk riding is the greatest and only real American Sport, and it takes regular men to play the gam(e)." Russell copyrighted this sculpture in 1925 with the title The Bucker and the Buckeroo. After the artist's death, an author on Russell's works identified this sculpture as The Weaver, a title Russell actually had intended for an earlier sculpture. | Base below horse's tail: CM Russell (skull) [Foundry mark:] ROMAN BRONZE WORKS NY. | This cast has a foliage support of the midsection of the horse. It appears that Russell originally intended the sculpture to be made without that support, but it must have been to difficult to cast. Also, in this cast, the McCarty rope going from horse to hand of rider is a twisted wire; in other casts it is more substantial. | 9.81.jpg | 9.81.JPG | bucking horse | Cowboy | Animal | Sculpture | bronze | Charles M. Russell (1864-1926) The Bucker and the Buckeroo modeled ca. 1923-24, copyright 1925, bronze Roman Bronze Works, N.Y. Gift of William E. Weiss Many considered Russell to be a true cowboy artist. He worked briefly as a cowboy and included various aspects of their life as subjects in his art. He admired their horsemanship and wrote, "Bronk riding is the greatest and only real American Sport, and it takes regular men to play the gam(e)." 9.81 | Russell, Charles M.

The Outlaw
Remington, Frederic | Sculpt...
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8.79 | 1906 | H: 23.5 in, Base Width: 8.25 in, Base Length: 13.5 in, Base Height: 1.375 in | The Outlaw | Remington's title refers not to the rider but to the horse; an untamable or vicious horse is often called an outlaw. The cowboy, in his efforts to conquer the wild horse, symbolized civilization's general exertions to control the Western wilderness. Careful observers will note that the spur on the rider's right foot is on upside down, an error made either at the foundry or in a more recent repair. | Upper left side of base, Copyright by/Frederic Remington. Stamped upper right side of base, Roman Bronze Works, N.Y. Inscribed underneath base, No 8. | Method of Acquistion: Other: Ownership received by the BBHC in lieu of a percentage of the royalties on the Alva Replica version of The Outlaw | 8.79v2.jpg | 8.79.JPG | 8.79.jpg | 8.79.web.jpg | 8.79v2.web.jpg | Animal | Cowboy | Sculpture | bronze | Remington, Frederic

The War Bridle
Remington, Frederic | Painti...
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8.12 | 1909 | H: 27 in, width: 30 in, Frame height: 31.75 in, Frame width: 34.75 in, frame depth: 2.5 in | The War Bridle | Gift in memory of A. Barton Hepburn and Cordelia H. Cushman | Remington titled this painting The War Bridle. The term "war bridle," refers to a "hitch of rope in the mouth and around the lower jaw of the horse." Remington, however, did not depict a rope "war bridle." The horse appears to wear a bridle with a bit and leather headstall. The painting's real subject is the immobilizing and calming of the horse by the cowboys' tying up the animal's hind leg, which is often called a "scotch hobble." In his copyright application Remington described this painting as "Two men hobbling a ponie." Perhaps the artist felt that the term "war bridle" described the horse's struggle against the wranglers' restraints. | top of frame on reverse: (in white chalk) CUSHMAN CUSHMAN. 2 labels on UL of foamcore backing | lower right corner: Frederic Remington / 1909 | l.23.86.1.jpg | L.23.86.1.v1.jpg | Painting | oil on canvas | Painted in the last year of his life, The War Bridle combines Frederic Remington’s new interest in the color and light of the Impressionists with a narrative theme of the Old West. The subject of two cowboys breaking a pony in a corral under a bright summer sky represents the taming of nature. Critics praised Remington’s new painterly style and remarked that it would assure the artist’s reputation as a true American painter rather than as a mere illustrator. | Remington, Frederic

The Wild, Spectac...
Wyeth, N.C. | Painting | oil...
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44.83 | 1904-1905 | H: 38.125 in, width: 26 in, Frame height: 46.25 in, Frame width: 34.125 in | The Wild, Spectacular Race for Dinner | Gift of John M. Schiff | In 1904, N.C. Wyeth made his first trip out West, even though as a young art student he had already obtained several commissions for Western illustrations. He worked for three weeks on a cattle roundup in Colorado which provide the inspiration for a series of paintings about cowboys. | LRC: N.C. Wyeth/Cottonwood Camp/1904 | Catalog rasionne: N.C. Wyeth: Catlaog Raisonne of Paintings, Volume one, Christine B. Podmaniczky, Scala Publishers Limited, London 2008, page 135 | 44.83.jpg | 44.83.web.jpg | 44.83.jpg | 44.83.JPG | 44.83.jpg | Animal | Group | Cowboy | Painting | oil on canvas | Wyeth, N.C.