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The animal that put the "cow" in "cowboy"

From 1866 to 1886, cowboys herded something like 20 million cattle from Texas to railheads in Kansas where they were shipped to Chicago and other points East. Because of your basic "glut," cattle wasn't worth much in Texas after the Civil War since stockmen couldn't get the cows to market due to the conflict. After the Civil War, folks in the north wand the east would pay high prices to get Texas beef. Several hundred miles-long trails like the Chisholm Trail, Great Western Trail, Goodnight-Loving Trail, and others, took a couple of months to get cattle typically from Texas to Kansas. It was tricky business: Not only were there trip hazards--rivers, wild animals, bad weather, cattle rustlers, and occasionally Indians--but there was also an art to getting the cattle to the stockyard without having them lose too much weight on the trail. If they did, the trip was for naught. Cattle drives have become a favorite of western artists through the decades. Look at the images below to decide what the artist wants us to know about a cattle drive.

A Buffalo Bill Center of the West Virtual Exhibit
Curated by: Marg2309


Corriente Gathering
Seabeck, Robert | Painting |...
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8.08 | 2008 | sight height: 12.25 in, sight width: 48.125 in, Frame height: 19.75 in, Frame width: 55.625 in, frame depth: 1.75 in | Corriente Gathering | William E. Weiss Purchase Award - 2008 Buffalo Bill Art Show | lower right of center: R. Seabeck | lower right of center: R. Seabeck | 8.08.jpg | Cowboy | longhorn | cattle | horse | Painting | oil on canvas | Robert Seabeck (b.1945) Corriente Gathering 2008, oil on canvas William E. Weiss Purchase Award–2008 Buffalo Bill Art Show Seabeck, a Wyoming artist, is familiar with the western lifestyle. For example, a cattle drive is not just an event of the Old West, but is current practice for living ranchers. The subject in art has long endured—as shown by the paintings here. 8.08 | Seabeck, Robert

Cutting Out
Wyeth, N.C. | Painting | oil...
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45.83 | 1904-1905 | H: 38 in, width: 25.875 in, Frame height: 46.25 in, Frame width: 34.125 in, frame depth: 3.5 in | Cutting Out | Gift of John M. Schiff | Wyeth wrote "Cutting out is a hard, wearisome task. There were some six thousand cattle in the herd that had been rounded up that morning, and it was the work of the men to weave through that mass and drive out certain brands..." | LRC: N.C. Wyeth/Colo.-1904- | quote was taken from article by N.C. Wyeth published in Scribner''s Magazine, vol. XXXIX, no. 3, March 1906, pages 285-290. | Catalog rasionne: N.C. Wyeth: Catlaog Raisonne of Paintings, Volume one, Christine B. Podmaniczky, Scala Publishers Limited, London 2008, pages 136-137 | 45.83.jpg | 45.83.jpg | 45.83.jpg | 45.83.JPG | Animal | Group | Cowboy | Painting | oil on canvas | N.C. Wyeth (1882-1945) Cutting Out (Colorado) 1904-1905, oil on canvas Gift of John M. Schiff In 1904, Wyeth made his first trip West. He worked for three weeks on a cattle roundup in Colorado. After Wyeth returned to Delaware, he completed a series of paintings about his experience. The artist portrayed lively scenes, sparking imaginations about what Western life was like in the early twentieth century. 45.83 | Wyeth, N.C.

Rounding Up
Wyeth, N.C. | Painting | oil...
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1.77 | 1904 | H: 38 in, width: 26 in, Frame height: 46.375 in, Frame width: 34.25 in | Rounding Up | Gift of John M. Schiff | In his painting of the cowboys rounding up cattle, Wyeth effectively depicts the cattle as a long sinuous line curling up the canyon. N.C. Wyeth headed a family of three generations of artists; he was the father of Andrew Wyeth and grandfather of James Wyeth. | LRC: N. C. Wyeth/Little Rattle-snake Creek/-1904- | Restricted from travel at curator's request. | Catalog rasionne: N.C. Wyeth: Catlaog Raisonne of Paintings, Volume one, Christine B. Podmaniczky, Scala Publishers Limited, London 2008, pages 134-135 | 1.77.jpg | 1.77.jpg | 1.77.jpg | 1.77.jpg | 1.77.web.jpg | 1.77.jpg | 1.77.JPG | Animal | Landscape | Group | Cowboy | Painting | oil on canvas | N. C. Wyeth made his first trip out West in 1904, even though he had already obtained several commissions for Western illustrations as a young art student. He worked for three weeks on a cattle roundup in Colorado, which provided the inspiration for a series of swashbuckling paintings about cowboys and life on the trail. Wyeth used these images to accompany “A Day at the Roundup,” a story he wrote for Scribner’s Magazine. | Wyeth, N.C.

The Wild, Spectac...
Wyeth, N.C. | Painting | oil...
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44.83 | 1904-1905 | H: 38.125 in, width: 26 in, Frame height: 46.25 in, Frame width: 34.125 in | The Wild, Spectacular Race for Dinner | Gift of John M. Schiff | In 1904, N.C. Wyeth made his first trip out West, even though as a young art student he had already obtained several commissions for Western illustrations. He worked for three weeks on a cattle roundup in Colorado which provide the inspiration for a series of paintings about cowboys. | LRC: N.C. Wyeth/Cottonwood Camp/1904 | Catalog rasionne: N.C. Wyeth: Catlaog Raisonne of Paintings, Volume one, Christine B. Podmaniczky, Scala Publishers Limited, London 2008, page 135 | 44.83.jpg | 44.83.web.jpg | 44.83.jpg | 44.83.JPG | 44.83.jpg | Animal | Group | Cowboy | Painting | oil on canvas | Wyeth, N.C.

Fifty Years of Tr...
Goodnight, Veryl | Print | h...
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38.09 | 2009 | Sheet height: 9 in, Sheet width: 11 in, Image height: 5 in, Image width: 6.875 in | Fifty Years of Trail Blazing | Gift of the artist | Top: Fifty Years of Trail Blazing Veryl Goodnight 2009 Bottom: History is being made every second. / Congratulations to the Whitney Gallery / For preserving the unique history of the American West | UR: Veryl Goodnight 2009 | 38.09.jpg | cattle | Print | hand-colored etching on paper | Goodnight, Veryl

Riding Herd in th...
Remington, Frederic | Drawin...
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1.63 | 1897 | H: 22 in, width: 30 in, Frame height: 30.25 in, Frame width: 38.25 in | Riding Herd in the Rain | Gift of Hon. C.V. Whitney | Remington created an interpretation of a profiled, windswept figure through his use of line and narrative. This profiled equestrian was a compositional element he used in several works. The effect of rain pouring down is achieved by using atmospheric perspective. The density of the wet sky weighs upon the rider through the use of values layered in the ink wash. The cowboy solemnly works through the rain as he helps herd cattle over the plains. | LR: Frederic Remington; LL: Copyright 1897/Russell & Son | 1.63.jpg | 1.63.JPG | 1.63.jpg | 1.63.web.jpg | Cowboy | Group | Landscape | Animal | Drawing | pen and ink and wash on paper | Remington, Frederic

Ruby Mountain Bal...
Waddell, Theodore | Painting...
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36.09 | 2009 | H: 9 in, width: 12 in | Ruby Mountain Baldies | Gift of the artist | LR: T Waddell reverse: Ruby Mountain Baldies / Theodore Waddell / 2009 (copyright symbol) | LR: T Waddell | 36.09.jpg | cattle | Painting | oil on paper | Waddell, Theodore

Stampede
Russell, Charles M. | Painti...
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13.91 | late 1880s | Image height: 5.394 in, Image width: 8.976 in, mat height: 16 in, mat width: 20 in, Frame height: 18.5 in, Frame width: 22.375 in, frame depth: 1.25 in | Stampede | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. S.H. Rosenthal, Jr. | This watercolor was done while Russell was working as a night wrangler in Montana. Cattle stampeding after being frightened by a thunderstorm may have been seen by Russell during his cowboy days. Notice the outstretched legs of the cattle. This unrealistic portrayal of running animals indicates that Russell painted this watercolor early in his career. | on backing: #1219 | Not to be sold, traded or otherwise disposed of for two years from date of gift. | 13.91.jpg | 13.91.jpg | lightning | cattle | Painting | watercolor on paper | Russell, Charles M.

They Stood There ...
Koerner, W.H.D. | Painting |...
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26.77 | 1928 | H: 29.125 in, width: 41 in, Frame height: 33.125 in, Frame width: 45.375 in | They Stood There Watching Him Move Off Across the Range, Leading His Pack Horse | Museum purchase | In order to illustrate the short story "Post Office at Dry Fork" by Hal G. Evarts in the November 3, 1928 issue of the Saturday Evening Post, Koerner used his studio props to represent the costume of cowboy Bud Crandall. The laconic cowboy with his small herd of cattle followed schoolteacher Miss Abby Howard from Wyoming town to Wyoming town. | LRC: W H D/Koerner/1928; On the back of the painting: Post Office at Dry Fork (Undecipherable) leading his pack horse, on which was travelling at the left of the Dry Fork | Book (softcover): W.H.D. Koerner: Der Maler des,,Wilden Westerns" aus Dithmarschen by Gerd Stolz, Husum, 2003, page 76 (bottom) | 26.77.jpg | 26.77.jpg | 26.77.web.jpg | 26.77.JPG | Cowboy | Group | Animal | Landscape | Painting | oil on canvas | Koerner, W.H.D.

The Cattle Drive
Clymer, John | Painting | oi...
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26.70 | 1969-1970 | H: 120.25 in, width: 60.25 in, Frame height: 124 in, Frame width: 64.375 in | The Cattle Drive | Gift of Winchester-Western Division, Olin Corporation | LLC: John Clymer/CA(the A is one space below the C) | 26.70.JPG | Landscape | Cowboy | Indian | Group | Animal | Painting | oil on canvas | Clymer, John

The Feed Trough
Post, Howard | Painting | oi...
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23.95 | 1995 | H: 78 in, width: 58.75 in, Frame height: 80.75 in, Frame width: 61 in | The Feed Trough | Gift of Hannah and Stuart Cutshall and the Artist | Post's modernist style employs a minimal use of detail, emphasizing the composition of the piece. The focus is on the colors of the West and the stark beauty of the landscape. The Feed Trough does not tell a story or stereotype the West, it captures the essence of reality. | 23.95.jpg | cattle | feed trough | Landscape | Painting | oil on canvas | Post, Howard

The Stampede
Jackson, Harry | Painting | ...
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29.65 | 1965 | sight height: 111.25 in, sight width: 245.75 in, Frame height: 116.625 in, Frame width: 250.125 in | The Stampede | Gift of The Coe Foundation | Painted as a companion to The Range Burial, The Stampede provides a tumultuous contrast to the quiet solemnity of the funeral scene. The cattle's wild panic during a fierce storm and the cowboy's tragic death contribute to the unsettling vigor of this work. Harry Jackson dedicated this painting in memory of painter Jackson Pollock, who was born in Cody, Wyoming. | LR: c.Harry Jackson 1965/Dedicated in memory of/the painter Jackson Pollock. | 29.65.JPG | 29.65.jpg | 29.65v1.jpg | Animal | Landscape | Group | Cowboy | Painting | oil on canvas | Jackson, Harry

Throwing a Steer
Rungius, Carl | Painting | o...
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1.66 | ca. 1919 | H: 30 in, width: 40 in, Frame height: 36.25 in, Frame width: 46.25 in | Throwing a Steer | Gift of the Jack Kriendler Memorial Foundation in honor of Mr. H. Peter Kriendler | During one of his trips to Wyoming, Rungius participated in cattle roundups, which he photographed. The artist then made paintings in an impressionistic style, based on his photographic studies. Labels on the back of this painting, written in the artist's handwriting, indicate that the artist titled this work Throwing a Steer, although the cattle do not appear to be steers. | LR: C Rungius | 1.66.JPG | 1.66.jpg | 1.66.web.jpg | Cowboy | Animal | Painting | oil on canvas | Carl Rungius (1869-1959) Throwing a Steer ca.1919, oil on canvas Gift of the Jack Kriendler Memorial Foundation in honor of Mr. H. Peter Kriendler During a trip to Wyoming, Rungius participated in a cattle roundup which he photographed. The artist then made paintings based on the photographs in an impressionistic style. On the back of this painting, the artist titled this work Throwing a Steer, although the cattle do not appear to be steers. 1.66 | Rungius, Carl

Waiting for a Chi...
Russell, Charles M. | Painti...
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88.60 | ca. 1903 | H: 20.5 in, width: 29 in, Frame height: 33.5 in, Frame width: 41.5 in, frame depth: 2 in | Waiting for a Chinook | Gift of Charles Ulrick and Josephine Bay Foundation, Inc. | Severe storms in the winter of 1886 - 1887 brought ruin to Montana's cattle industry. When owners of a herd of 5,000 cattle requested a report on their herd, cowboy Charles Russell simply drew a starving cow about to drop before ravenous wolves and titled it Waiting for a Chinook, (a warm west wind). His drawing conveyed the impending disaster more eloquently than any written report. Later he painted this larger version and added the additional title by which the work had become known, The Last of 5000. | LLC: C M Russell(skull);LL: Waiting For A Chinook/The Last of 5000 | Film: Theodore Roosevelt: An American Lion; Greystone Communications, North Hollywood, CA; two (2) film tape set; 2003| | 88.60.jpg | 88.60.JPG | 88.60.jpg | 88.60.web.jpg | 88.60.jpg | 88.60.jpg | 88.60.jpg | Landscape | Animal | wolf | Group | Painting | watercolor on paper | Russell, Charles M.

Whitney Gallery C...
Seabeck, Robert | Painting |...
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6.09 | 2009 | H: 9.125 in, width: 11.875 in | Whitney Gallery Congratulations 50th Anniversary | Gift of the artist | | Whitney Gallery Congratulations 50 Anniversary | One (1) painting, oil on board, 9 x 12 inches, Title: Whitney Gallery Congratulations 50th Anniversary, signed LCR: R. Seabeck '09. Reverse: R. Seabeck | Laramie, Wyoming | 2009 | Congratulations! | 6.09.jpg | Cowboy | cattle | Painting | oil on board | Seabeck, Robert


 

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