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Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West -SLC

The Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) is the latest stop on the "Go West! Art of the American Frontier" tour for the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Salt Lake City is the fourth venue for this well-traveled—and well received—exhibition, following shows at the High Museum in Atlanta, Georgia (2014); the Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Springs, California (2015); and last year’s stint at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska. Go West! features some of the Center’s most extraordinary artwork from a “Who’s Who” in art of the American West: Alfred Jacob Miller, William T. Ranney, John Mix Stanley, Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Moran, Frederic Remington, Charles M. Russell, and W.H.D. Koerner, to name a few. Indeed, the works from this period were instrumental in shaping our perceptions of the American West—and still do today. We here at the Center of the West are on the trailing edge of our Centennial year—a grand celebration of our past, and a nod to the new century ahead. We’re committed to the vision of our namesake, and the organization founded in his memory in 1917, i.e. taking the West to the world. So, at a time when our foot traffic slows, Go West! allows us to do exactly that as we dispatch our most important and most popular works to other museums throughout the country during our “off season.” With that, Go West! actually heads a little south to Salt Lake City’s renowned Utah Museum of Fine Arts, December 3, 2017-March11, 2018. , Take a look at the gallery below to discover more about the works that made the trip! #GoWest

A Buffalo Bill Center of the West Virtual Exhibit
Curated by: Marg2309


The Lewis and Cla...
Burnham, Thomas Mickell | Pa...
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Exhibit notes: Thomas Mickell Burnham (American, 1818-1866). "The Lewis and Clark Expedition," ca. 1850

Museum record: 21.78 | ca. 1850 | H: 36.125 in, width: 48.5 in, Frame height: 45.25 in, Frame width: 57 in | The Lewis and Clark Expedition | Museum purchase | Meriwether Lewis and William Clark led the United States government's first official exploration of the western part of the North American continent. Their 1804-1806 exploring party did not include an artist, so visual images of the land and its features were not a significant part of their report. In the following years artists have commemorated and interpreted the expedition. Burnham depicted the leaders in a lush, idyllic landscape that portrays the West as a type of Garden of Eden. | LR: Burnham,/Painter/Troy | Magazine: Field & Stream, Times Mirror Magazines, Inc., November 1994, The Right Stuff by Jim Merritt, page 42-43. | 21.78.jpg | 21.78.JPG | 21.78.web.jpg | 21.78.jpg | Landscape | Figure | Animal | Lewis and Clark | Group | Painting | oil on canvas | Meriwether Lewis and William Clark led the United States government's first official exploration of the western part of the North American continent between 1804 and 1806. Their party did not include an artist, however, so visual images of the landscape did not feature significantly in their report. In the years that followed, artists like Thomas Mickell Burnham commemorated the expedition, here depicting its leaders in a lush, idyllic landscape that imagines the West as a glorious Garden of Eden. | Burnham, Thomas Mickell

Shar-I-Tar-Ish
Inman, Henry | Painting | oi...
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Exhibit notes: Henry Inman (American, 1801-1846). "Shar-I-Tar-Ish," 1832

Museum record: 21.95.2 | 1832 | H: 30.375 in, width: 25.625 in, Frame height: 38.5 in, Frame width: 33.25 in, frame depth: 2.375 in | Shar-I-Tar-Ish | Gift of the Blank Family Foundation | Shar-I-Tar-Ish, a Pawnee chief, visited Washington, D.C. in 1821. While he was there, the federal government commissioned Charles Bird King to paint his portrait. Thomas L. McKenney, superintendent of Indian Affairs, later had artist Henry Inman secretly paint copies of the King portraits. These copies were used to create the first major publication of Indian portraits, History of the Indian Tribes of North America. | LRC: 28222 [verso, top of frame, etched inwood:] T (partially covered with paper) 3 [left frame, etched in wood:] R [in chalk:] PEABODY # (indecipherible) [bottom frame etched in wood:] Bt | 21.95.2.jpg | 21.95.2.JPG | 21.95.2.jpg | 21.95.2.jpg | 21.95.2.web.jpg | Painting | oil on canvas | Henry Inman (1801-1846) Shar-I-Tar-Ish 1832, oil on canvas Gift of the Blank Family Foundation, 21.95.2 Shar-I-Tar-Ish, a Pawnee chief, visited Washington, D.C. in 1821. While he was there, the federal government commissioned Charles Bird King to paint his portrait. Thomas L. McKenney, superintendent of Indian Affairs, later had artist Henry Inman secretly paint copies of the King portraits. These copies were used to create the first major publication of Indian portraits, History of the Indian Tribes of North America. | Henry Inman (1801-1846) Shar-I-Tar-Ish 1832, oil on canvas Gift of the Blank Family Foundation Commissioned in 1821 by the Federal Government, Charles Bird King painted a series of portraits which included this Pawnee chief. Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Thomas L. McKenney, had Inman secretly paint copies of the portraits in order to publish them. Later, many of King's portraits were destroyed in a fire. 21.95.2 | Henry Inman (1801-1846) Shar-I-Tar-Ish 1832, oil on canvas Gift of the Blank Family Foundation Shar-I-Tar-Ish, a Pawnee chief, visited Washington, DC, in 1821. While there, the federal government hired Charles Bird King to paint his portrait. Later, the superintendent of Indian Affairs had artist Henry Inman secretly paint copies of King’s portraits. Inman’s copies composed the first major publication of Indian portraits, History of the Indian Tribes of North America. 21.95.2 | Between 1821 and 1828, Thomas L. McKenney, the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, commissioned portraits of hundreds of American Indian leaders on diplomatic missions to Washington, D.C. Painted first by Charles Bird King and later duplicated by Henry Inman, these portraits were intended to serve as a “National Indian Gallery.” Over 120 were reproduced in McKenney’s three-volume portfolio, History of the Indian Tribes of North America. | Inman, Henry

Hoo-Wan-Ne-Ka (Li...
Inman, Henry | Painting | oi...
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21.95.1 | 1832 | H: 30.625 in, width: 25.625 in, Frame height: 39 in, Frame width: 34 in, frame depth: 2.375 in | Hoo-Wan-Ne-Ka (Little Elk) | Gift of Allen & Company Incorporated | A Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Chief who fought for the British during the War of 1812, Hoo-Wan-Ne-Ka or Little Elk, later made peace with the United States. He was a signer of the Prairie du Chien Treaty in 1825 and several other important treaties. | LRC: 28255 [verso, top of frame:] IV (or IX) (in chalk) Little Elk (in black paint:) 5 [top stretcher, in chalk:] Little Elk man (written in pencil) 28225 (on piece of white tape) #5/ 5B [bottom of frame:] 5 | 21.95.1.jpg | 21.95.1.JPG | 21.95.1.web.jpg | 21.95.1.jpg | Painting | oil on canvas | Between 1821 and 1828, Thomas L. McKenney, the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, commissioned portraits of hundreds of American Indian leaders on diplomatic missions to Washington, D.C. Painted first by Charles Bird King and later duplicated by Henry Inman, these portraits were intended to serve as a “National Indian Gallery.” Over 120 were reproduced in McKenney’s three-volume portfolio, History of the Indian Tribes of North America. | Inman, Henry

The Lost Greenhorn
Miller, Alfred Jacob | Paint...
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9.70 | 1866 | H: 17.875 in, width: 23.875 in, Frame height: 23.125 in, Frame width: 29.125 in, frame depth: 2.5 in | The Lost Greenhorn | Gift of The Coe Foundation | Miller accompanied a caravan taking supplies to the fur traders' rendezvous in 1837. In this painting the artist portrayed the caravan's cook who became lost on the great prairie when he set out alone to go buffalo hunting. Miller's image also seems to symbolize the romanticism of westward expansion, with the independent figure looking resolutely into the distance. | LR: AJM.(monogram) | Curator once thought this picture was possibly commissioned by William Warfield, Lexington, Kentucky, account book, November 14, 1866. This is no longer thought to be correct. (SEB 3/2004) | 9.70.jpg | 9.70.jpg | 9.70.jpg | 9.70.JPG | 9.70.jpg | 9.70.web.jpg | Figure | Painting | oil on canvas | Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874) The Lost Greenhorn ca. 1860, oil on canvas Gift of The Coe Foundation, 9.70 Miller accompanied a caravan taking supplies to the fur traders' rendezvous in 1837. In this painting the artist portrayed the caravan's cook who became lost on the great prairie when he set out alone to go buffalo hunting. Miller's image can also symbolize westward expansion, with the independent figure looking into the distance. | Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874) The Lost Greenhorn ca. 1860, oil on canvas Gift of The Coe Foundation, 9.70 Miller accompanied a caravan taking supplies to the fur traders' rendezvous in 1837. In this painting the artist portrayed the caravan's cook who became lost on the great prairie when he set out alone to go buffalo hunting. Miller's image can also symbolize westward expansion, with the independent figure looking into the distance. | The Lost Greenhorn recounts a colorful story of a young cook on Alfred Jacob Miller’s 1837 expedition. The cook set out on his own, against all advice, to hunt buffalo, only to become lost amid a sea of prairie grass. The title, which plays upon the young man’s overestimation of his untested skills against the deceptively vast spaces of the Great Plains, offers a humorous take on the unnerving experience many would have encountered on the journey West. | Miller, Alfred Jacob

Indian Elopement
Miller, Alfred Jacob | Paint...
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28.64 | 1852 | H: 30.25 in, width: 36.25 in, Image height: 29.25 in, Image width: 36.25 in, Frame height: 36 in, Frame width: 43.25 in | Indian Elopement | Given in memory of Mai Rogers Coe by her son Robert Coe | A young Indian male, smitten by the charms of a maiden from a nearby tribe, has observed her camp until the warriors left for the day. Stealing into the compound he has persauded her to mount his horse and, fording the river, left the elders on the bank in dismay. | LR: Miller 1852 | has been relined - new stretcher;stretcher bar - A8412; label on stretcher:No. 61493 (red) Picture;also on stretcher - A99368. | 28.64.JPG | 28.64.jpg | Landscape | Indian | Animal | Group | Painting | oil on canvas | Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874) Indian Elopement 1852, oil on canvas Given in memory of Mai Rogers Coe by her son Robert Coe A young Indian male, smitten by the charms of a maiden from a nearby tribe, has observed her camp until the warriors left for the day. Stealing into the compound he persuaded her to mount his horse and, fording the river, leave the elders on the bank in dismay. 28.64 | Miller, Alfred Jacob

A Surround of Buf...
Miller, Alfred Jacob | Paint...
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2.76 | 1848-1858 | H: 30.375 in, width: 44.125 in, Frame height: 38.5 in, Frame width: 52.625 in, frame depth: 3.5 in | A Surround of Buffalo by Indians | Gift of William E. Weiss | Miller once described the buffalo hunt: "[The Indians] all start at once with frightful yells and commence racing around the herd, drawing their circle closer and closer, until the whole body is huddled together in confusion. Now they begin firing, and as this throws them [the buffalo] into a headlong panic and furious rage, each man selects his animal." | LL: A Miller | Film: Documentary; Washakie: Last Chief of the Eastern Shoshone, Kyle Nicholoff, Director, KCWC-TV Wyoming Public Television, Riverton, 2003 | 2.76.JPG | 2.76.jpg | 2.76.web.jpg | 2.76.jpg | 2.76.jpg | hunt | Animal | Other | Painting | oil on canvas | Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874) A Surround of Buffalo by Indians 1848-1858, oil on canvas Gift of William E. Weiss, 2.76 | Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874) A Surround of Buffalo by Indians 1848-1858, oil on canvas Gift of William E. Weiss, 2.76 | Miller, Alfred Jacob

The Last of Their...
Stanley, John Mix | Painting...
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5.75 | 1857 | H: 43 in, width: 60 in, Frame height: 52.125 in, Frame width: 68.5 in, frame depth: 3 in | The Last of Their Race | Museum Purchase | An allegory on the theme of the Indian as a dying race, this painting depicts remnants of the tribes pushed to the edge of the ocean with the sun setting in the distance and buffalo skulls forecasting the end. Stanley arranged his representatives of the tribes and ages in a pyramid, giving a classical composition to his painting. | LLC: J. M. Stanley/1857 | Book: Henry Farny Paints the Far West by Susan Labry Meyn; Cincinnati Art Museum; Cincinnati; 2007; page 24 | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.JPG | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.jpg | 5.75.web.jpg | Animal | Group | Indian | Landscape | Painting | oil on canvas | John Mix Stanley (1814-1872) Last of Their Race 1857, oil on canvas 5.75 This painting is an allegory of the Indian as a dying race. Stanley portrayed the tribes being pushed to the edge of the ocean , the sun setting in the distance, and buffalo skulls forecasting the end. | John Mix Stanley (1814-1872) The Last of Their Race 1857, oil on canvas Museum Purchase, 5.75 This painting reveals a veiled symbolic message. Its title and composition echo the common sentiment that America's Indian tribes were doomed to disappear in the face of Euro-American's westward expansion. In Stanley's depiction, the group has quite literally been pushed to the brink of extinction on America's westernmost shore. | Stanley, John Mix

Advice on the Pra...
Ranney, William | Painting |...
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10.91 | 1853 | H: 38.75 in, width: 55.25 in, Frame height: 45.625 in, Frame width: 61.325 in, frame depth: 3.125 in | Advice on the Prairie | Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran | Ranney painted "genre" paintings, scenes of everyday life on the American frontier. In this painting he portrayed a group of Western immigrants, including a family, camped with their wagon for the evening. They listen to tales of what they will encounter from a mountain man, the representative of an earlier period of frontier history. | LR, in script: W. Ranney./..53 | Magazine: Cowboys & Indians: 15 Paintings: The Story of the Amercian West has been Told in Blood, Sweat, Tears-and Paint by Emily Sachar, USFR Media Group, October 2008, page 130. | 10.91.jpg | 10.91.v1.jpg | 10.91.jpg | 10.91.JPG | 10.91.v1.jpg | 10.91.v1.jpg | 10.91.v1.web.jpg | Prairie | pioneers | covered | wagon | Painting | oil on canvas | William Ranney (1813 - 1857) Advice on the Prairie 1853, oil on canvas Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran,10.91 Ranney painted "genre" paintings, scenes of everyday life on the American frontier. In this painting he portrayed a group of Western immigrants, including a family, camped with their wagon for the evening. They listen to tales of what they will encounter from a mountain man, the representative of an earlier period of frontier history. | William Ranney was best known for his scenes of everyday life on the American frontier. In this painting he portrayed a group of Western immigrants, including a family with young children, camped with their wagon for the evening. They listen intently to tales of what they might encounter on their journey from a seated scout, who represents an earlier era of frontier history. The young woman standing to the rear cradling an infant represents the “Prairie Madonna,” who personified manifest destiny and the idea that Euro-American populations had a divine right to settle the West. | Ranney, William

NA.106.147
Tsistsistas | Cheyenne | Sou...
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NA.106.147 | ca.1885 | L: 23.5 in, width: 14.75 in | Chandler-Pohrt Collection, Gift of Mr. William D. Weiss | Parfleche - yellow/blue geometric design painted on leather. | na.106.147v1.jpg | na.106.147v2.jpg | na.106.147.jpg | blue | geometric | painted | yellow | parfleche | rawhide | pigment | Women of the Cheyenne and other Plains tribes created a variety of rawhide bags, painted in vibrant geometric designs, to accommodate the shapes and sizes of the objects they held. The parfleche—a large, flat, envelope-shaped container—was the most common form. Made of durable buffalo rawhide and often found in sets of two with matching designs, parfleches filled with food, clothing, and other belongings were hung by hide loops in tipis and transported on horses and dogs when families traveled. | Tsistsistas | Cheyenne | Southern Plains

NA.108.15
Crow | Apsáalooke | Norther...
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NA.108.15 | ca. 1860 | Diameter: 20 in | Adolf Spohr Collection, Gift of Larry Sheerin | Utensils and implements - Fighting (could also be used for ritual ceremonies). Shield and cover - tanned, rawhide shield and buckskin cover with black painted animal figure and lines on front. Tassels of blue glass beads and golden eagle feathers attached. | na.108.15.JPG | NA.108.15.jpg | na.108.15.jpg | painted | Animal | cover | shield | feathers | paint | glass beads | tanned deer hide | golden eagle feathers | Buffalo rawhide shields and their tanned hide covers provided both physical and spiritual protection for warriors in battle. Following dreams or visions, warriors painted their shields and covers with symbols of such sacred powers as birds, bears, buffalo, the moon, stars, thunder, and lightning. On this shield cover, the painted image of the grizzly bear, with its powerful jaws, teeth, and claws, would have protected its owner by bestowing the bear’s strength and fearlessness on him as he went into battle. | Crow | Apsáalooke | Northern Plains

The Last of the B...
Bierstadt, Albert | Painting...
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2.60 | ca. 1888 | H: 60.25 in, width: 96.5 in, Frame height: 68.5 in, Frame width: 105.5 in | The Last of the Buffalo | Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney Trust Fund Purchase | With bleeding buffalo and bleached skulls in the foreground, the landscape artist Bierstadt represented the theme of wildlife vanishing from the wilderness. He made the shapes of distant mountains repeat the shapes of the main figures, thus underlining the interdependent relationships in nature. The Last of the Buffalo implies other endings. | LLC: ABierstadt | Book: Redrawing Boundaries: Perspectives on Western American Art; Institute of Western American Art, Denver; and the University of Washington Press, Seattle; 2007, page 75 | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.JPG | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.jpg | 2.60.web.jpg | Animal | hunting | Indian | Other | Painting | oil on canvas | Bierstadt, Albert

The Golden Gate, ...
Moran, Thomas | Painting | o...
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4.75 | 1893 | H: 36.25 in, width: 50.25 in, Frame height: 46.5 in, Frame width: 60.5 in, frame depth: 4 in | The Golden Gate, Yellowstone National Park | Museum purchase | Moran's name became synonymous with Yellowstone. He accompanied the official governmental expedition into the region in 1871. His sketches of the wonders helped to convince Congress to establish Yellowstone as the first national park. The artist returned to the Park in 1892 and painted a view of the pass named Golden Gate. | LRC: TMoran./1893 | Book: Exhibition catalog; America! Storie di pittura dal Nuovo Mondo; linead'ombralibri, Treviso, Italy; 2007; page 64-65 | 4.75.jpg | 4.75.jpg | 4.75.JPG | 4.75.jpg | 4.75.jpg | 4.75.web.jpg | transportation | Figure | Landscape | Group | Animal | Painting | oil on canvas | Thomas Moran (1837-1926) Golden Gate, Yellowstone National Park 1893, oil on canvas Museum purchase Thomas "Yellowstone" Moran was the artist's nickname because of his close ties to Yellowstone National Park. He joined an official government expedition to the region in 1871. The artist returned to the Park in 1892 and painted a view of the pass named Golden Gate. 4.75 | Born in England, Thomas Moran created thousands of oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, and prints of the American West. The artist accompanied Ferdinand V. Hayden’s 1871 survey of the Yellowstone region and catapulted to fame the following year when Congress purchased his monumental painting The Grand Cañon of the Yellowstone, 1872. Twenty years later Moran returned to Yellowstone to paint the dramatic landscapes that had made him famous. This view of the passage known as the Golden Gate highlights a new trestle, built to accommodate the growing number of tourists drawn to America’s first national park. | Moran, Thomas

In the Foothills ...
Rungius, Carl | Painting | o...
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2.72 | n.d. | H: 30.25 in, width: 40.25 in, Frame height: 36.5 in, Frame width: 46.75 in, frame depth: 2.75 in | In the Foothills (Antelope) | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Sheerin | Rungius found Wyoming to be a great country for wildlife when he first visited the state in 1895. He began painting antelope and said "When I saw a bunch out of range I attracted their attention by rising a number of times and disappearing again. Antelope have a great bump of curiosity and anything unusual fascinated them." | LR: C Rungius | 2.72.JPG | 2.72.jpg | 2.72.jpg | 2.72.jpg | 2.72.web.jpg | Animal | Painting | oil on canvas | By the turn of the twentieth century, wilderness was no longer viewed as an obstacle to be overcome and was understood to be endangered. President Theodore Roosevelt established five national parks, and John Muir’s Sierra Club was formed in 1892. Artists not only depicted the disappearing wilderness and wildlife of the West but also became involved with conservation efforts. Roosevelt and Albert Bierstadt were founding members of the Boone and Crockett Club, a hunting group dedicated to protecting wildlife whose members also included Carl Rungius and Alexander Phimister Proctor. | Rungius, Carl

The War Bridle
Remington, Frederic | Painti...
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8.12 | 1909 | H: 27 in, width: 30 in, Frame height: 31.75 in, Frame width: 34.75 in, frame depth: 2.5 in | The War Bridle | Gift in memory of A. Barton Hepburn and Cordelia H. Cushman | Remington titled this painting The War Bridle. The term "war bridle," refers to a "hitch of rope in the mouth and around the lower jaw of the horse." Remington, however, did not depict a rope "war bridle." The horse appears to wear a bridle with a bit and leather headstall. The painting's real subject is the immobilizing and calming of the horse by the cowboys' tying up the animal's hind leg, which is often called a "scotch hobble." In his copyright application Remington described this painting as "Two men hobbling a ponie." Perhaps the artist felt that the term "war bridle" described the horse's struggle against the wranglers' restraints. | top of frame on reverse: (in white chalk) CUSHMAN CUSHMAN. 2 labels on UL of foamcore backing | lower right corner: Frederic Remington / 1909 | l.23.86.1.jpg | L.23.86.1.v1.jpg | Painting | oil on canvas | Painted in the last year of his life, The War Bridle combines Frederic Remington’s new interest in the color and light of the Impressionists with a narrative theme of the Old West. The subject of two cowboys breaking a pony in a corral under a bright summer sky represents the taming of nature. Critics praised Remington’s new painterly style and remarked that it would assure the artist’s reputation as a true American painter rather than as a mere illustrator. | Remington, Frederic

The Cheyenne
Remington, Frederic | Sculpt...
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17.71 | 1902 | H: 22.5 in, overall length: 23.75 in, Base Width: 7.75 in, Base Length: 14.5 in, Base Width: 7.25 in | The Cheyenne | Gift of Mrs. Henry H.R. Coe | In much of Remington's work during his early career, the Indian served as a symbolic foe - a hostile and resistant force set squarely in the path of progress. The Cheyenne carries, in the sweep of his dynamic charge and grimacing expression, the bold presence and resolute gesture of Native peoples in desperate defense of their world. | Front right top of base: Frederic Remington, Rear right top of base: ROMAN BRONZE WORKS N.Y., Rear left side of base; Copyrighted 1902 by/ Frederic Remington, Underneath base - center 9 | 17.71.JPG | Indian | Figure | Sculpture | bronze | Frederic Remington worked closely with the personnel at the foundries who cast his sculptures from clay models into finished bronzes. He pushed the medium of bronze to new artistic heights, seeming to transform the hard metal into horsehide or the fur of a buffalo robe. Furthermore, bold compositions like The Cheyenne appear to defy gravity. Here, the mounted warrior, united as one with his horse, gallops at top speed, all four of his horse’s hooves lifted off the ground. | Remington, Frederic

When Wagons Meant...
Russell, Charles M. | Painti...
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3.93 | 1900 | Frame height: 17.75 in, Frame width: 23.625 in, H: 12.25 in, width: 18.125 in | When Wagons Meant Plunder | Bequest of Lewis B. Maytag, Jr | In 1900 Russell experienced stability in his life; he and wife Nancy moved into their own home. In his art he developed characteristic compositions and began to lighten his palette. Russell portrayed a group stalking an enemy in the distance by using a compositional device of a pyramid-shaped rock which anchors the painting. Russell depicted this scene, as well as many others, from the viewpoint of the Indian. | LLC: C M Russell (buffalo skull) 1900 | 3.93.jpg | 3.93.JPG | wagon train | Indians | Painting | oil on board | Charles M. Russell was not only the favorite son of Montana, he came to personify the West itself. His works were immensely popular because of their narrative subject matter, romantic style, and thrilling action, as well as his ability to convincingly create fictionalized history. In this painting and many others, Russell depicted the scene from the viewpoint of its Indian subjects, inverting the more common narrative that placed Euro-Americans as the protagonists. | Russell, Charles M.

The Last Drop
Schreyvogel, Charles | Sculp...
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55.72 | 1903 | H: 12 in, Base Width: 4.875 in, Base Length: 18.375 in | The Last Drop | Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Goppert, Sr. | In planning the painting of The Last Drop, Schreyvogel made a three-dimensional model. He later had the model cast in bronze. | Left rear top of base: Copyrighted 1903 by Chas Schreyvogel; Left/rear bottom of base: Roman Bronze Works N-Y-; Underneath: No 72 | 55.72.JPG | Cowboy | Animal | Sculpture | bronze | Schreyvogel, Charles

Indian Warrior
Proctor, Alexander Phimister...
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4.08.2 | 1896-1899 | width: 30.5 in, depth: 10.5 in, H: 38.625 in, L: 37.1875 in, Diameter: .25 in, L: 3.625 in, L: 1.1875 in, L: 17.75 in | Indian Warrior | Gift of A. Phimister Proctor Museum with special thanks to Sandy and Sally Church | Proctor portrayed his subject in a heroic pose, mounted on horseback as military leaders have traditionally been depicted. To research Indian subjects the artist traveled to the Blackfeet reservation in Montana. Although Weasel Head, a Blackfeet, served as the final model for this figure, the sculpture is not a specific portrait. Proctor created an idealized image of the Indian as a proud and noble warrior. | left top back of base: APHIMISTER PROCTOR/ 1898/ GOLD MEDAL/ PARIS EXPOSITION/ 1900 [right top of base:] COPY RT 1899 [lower right edge of base:] GORHAM Co. FOUNDERS/ (box)/ QRM [left rear of base:] PALLO | The spear on the sculpture is a reproduction .Weiss notified the BBHC by a letter dated June 15, 2005 that he sold the bronze to Mr. & Mrs. Phimister P. Church. | l.18.94.2.jpg | 4.08.2.jpg | horse | Indian | Sculpture | bronze | Alexander Phimister Proctor (1860 - 1950) Indian Warrior modeled 1898, copyright 1899, cast initially 1900-1902; bronze, cast by Gorham Co. Founders Loan from A. Phimister Proctor Museum, L.258.2005.1 Proctor portrayed his subject in a heroic pose, mounted on horseback as military leaders have traditionally been depicted. To research Indian subjects the artist traveled to the Blackfeet reservation in Montana. Although Weasel Head, a Blackfeet, served as the final model for this figure, the sculpture is not a specific portrait. Proctor created an idealized image of the Indian as a proud and noble warrior. | Alexander Phimister Proctor portrayed his subject in a heroic pose, mounted on horseback, as military leaders have traditionally been depicted. The artist traveled to the Blackfeet reservation in Montana to research his subjects, and although an Indian named Weasel Head served as the model for this figure, the sculpture is not intended as a specific portrait. Proctor created an idealized image of the American Indian as a proud and noble warrior, blending European artistic traditions with a wholly American subject. | Proctor, Alexander Phimister

"Bucking"
Wyeth, N.C. | Painting | oil...
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2.77 | 1904-1905 | H: 38 in, width: 26.125 in, Frame height: 46.125 in, Frame width: 34 in | "Bucking" | Gift of John M. Schiff | N.C. Wyeth headed a family of three generations of artists. He was the father of Henriette and Andrew Wyeth and grandfather of James Wyeth. Henriette married one of her father's pupils, artist Peter Hurd. | LL: N. C. Wyeth/Jim's Canyon Colo./-1904- | Catalog rasionne: N.C. Wyeth: Catlaog Raisonne of Paintings, Volume one, Christine B. Podmaniczky, Scala Publishers Limited, London 2008, pages 136-137 | 2.77.JPG | 2.77.jpg | 2.77.jpg | Animal | Landscape | Cowboy | Painting | oil on canvas | N.C. Wyeth (1882-1945) Bucking (Jim’s Canyon Colo.) 1904-1905, oil on canvas Gift of John M. Schiff N.C. Wyeth headed a family of three generations of artists. He was the father of Henriette and Andrew Wyeth and grandfather of James Wyeth. Henriette married one of her father’s pupils, artist Peter Hurd. 2.77 | N. C. Wyeth made his first trip out West in 1904, even though he had already obtained several commissions for Western illustrations as a young art student. He worked for three weeks on a cattle roundup in Colorado, which provided the inspiration for a series of swashbuckling paintings about cowboys and life on the trail. Wyeth used these images to accompany “A Day at the Roundup,” a story he wrote for Scribner’s Magazine. | Wyeth, N.C.

End of the Trail
Fraser, James Earle | Sculpt...
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112.67 | ca. 1918-1923 | H: 33.75 in, L: 26 in, Base Width: 6.5 in, Base Length: 20.75 in, width: 8 in | End of the Trail | Clara Peck Purchase Fund | The End of the Trail has appealed to public sentiment since its conception following Chicago's 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. Inspired by the exposition's fusing of the nostalgic with the progressive, Fraser made a windblown and destitute symbol which represented the public's belief in the sad, yet inevitable extinction of the Indian. In 1915 the artist exhibited a monumental version of this subject at the thematically - appropriate site of the Panama - Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco, and its popularity led him to make smaller casts such as this one. | Rear Right Side of Base: For my friend/Warren Delano/E Fraser, Rear Left Side of Base: c (circled) Fraser 1918, Left Side of Base: Roman Bronze Works N-Y- [underside of base:] RB 12 | 112.67.jpg | 112.67.JPG | Figure | Indian | Animal | Sculpture | bronze | Fraser, James Earle

Viewing the Curios
Cooper, A.D.M. | Painting | ...
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5.64 | 1909 | H: 14.125 in, width: 17 in, Frame height: 18.5 in, Frame width: 21.5 in | Viewing the Curios | Bequest in memory of Houx and Newell families. | LL: A. D. M. Cooper 1909 (?) | 5.64.JPG | 5.64.jpg | 5.64.web.jpg | Indian | Figure | Painting | oil on canvas | A.D.M. Cooper (1856-1924) Viewing the Curios 1909, oil on canvas Bequest in memory of Houx and Newell families, 5.64 | Astley D. M. Cooper grew up in Saint Louis hearing stories of the American West. George Catlin was a friend of the family, and his grandfather was an Indian agent. In these paintings, Cooper questions the relationship between illusion and reality for his American Indian subjects as well as for the viewer. Warriors in feathered headdresses examine items that Euro-Americans valued about Indian culture—collectible objects such as a war club, a buffalo mount, or a painting—while viewers of these paintings see the Indian himself as a rare object, a curio. | Cooper, A.D.M.

Where Great Herds...
Russell, Charles M. | Painti...
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87.60 | 1901 | H: 30 in, width: 36 in, Frame height: 39 in, Frame width: 45 in, frame depth: 3.5 in | Where Great Herds Come to Drink | Gift of Charles Ulrick and Josephine Bay Foundation, Inc. | Dawn or dusk: a time for drink. Soft light is reflected upon mesa and butte outcroppings that rise out of arid plains, home for the great herds. The lead buffalo stares as if the viewers are threatening this pastoral scene. While herding their young, these buffalo share the water with other herbivores, the elk. | LLC: C M Russell/(skull)/1901 | Acoustiguide. | Zapadnoevropeiskaya i amerikanskaya zhivopis’ iz muzeev S. Sh.A. [Western European and American painting from the museums of the U.S.A. Catalogue of an exhibition held at the Hermitage and the Pushkin Museum, Moscow, Kiev, 1976. | 87.60.jpg | 87.60.jpg | 87.60.web.jpg | 87.60.jpg | 87.60.jpg | 87.60.JPG | Landscape | Animal | Group | Painting | oil on canvas | Russell, Charles M.

Dividing The Chie...
Sharp, Joseph Henry | Painti...
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1.61 | ca. 1905 | H: 27 in, width: 39.375 in, Frame height: 33.625 in, Frame width: 46.25 in | Dividing The Chief's Property | Whitney Purchase Fund | Sharp portrayed the Indian mourners in a procession that has the solemnity of ancient funerary monuments. This painting depicts the custom of giving the deceased's belongings to the mourners. | 1.61.jpg | 1.61.JPG | 1.61.jpg | Indian | Group | Painting | oil on canvas | Joseph Henry Sharp (1859–1953) Dividing The Chief’s Property ca. 1905, oil on canvas Whitney Purchase Fund Sharp closely observed Crow burial customs, and depicted their funeral rituals in many of his paintings. In this scene, Sharp shows the custom of giving the deceased’s belongings to mourners. The passing of the Crow chief and the procession of mourners symbolized the gradual disappearance of many Native American traditions. 1.61 | Cincinnati artist Joseph Henry Sharp first visited the Crow Agency in Montana in 1900. He built a cabin on the reservation in 1905 and often spent his winters there. Despite witnessing the changes to Plains Indian life affected by the reservation system, Sharp sought picturesque images that looked to the past. He painted this mourning ritual of giving the deceased’s belongings away not only as a witness to the event but also as a symbolic lament for traditional Indian customs. | Sharp, Joseph Henry