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Whitney Western Art Museum

Makers
Walton Ford
Descriptions
ink 259 paper 704
Names
etching 9
Date:
2000
Dimensions:
H: 44 in, width: 31 in, Frame height: 47.25 in, Frame width: 34.25 in, frame depth: 1.5 in
Title:
Tale of Johnny Nutkin
Credit Line:
Gift of the Mary A. H. Rumsey Foundation
Gloss:
Walton Ford is one of the most important artists working in America today. His prints, especially address America's history. At first, Ford's work is easily compared to prints by John James Audubon (such as the "Great American Cock" in the detailed realism in the birds and animals. However, the departures from Audubon are telling. Ford's animals are often debauched and violent. Deeper meaning in the backgrounds and the actions of the animals reference human interaction with animals, or the darker side of the country's cultural history (including slavery and Indian removal act, for example). Many of his prints contain literacy references, such as the "Tale of Johnny Nutkin," a play off Beatrix Potter's story, "The tale of Squirrel Nutkin." In the Whitney's collection, these two prints will be a nice addition to the Audubon prints, as well as the Penelope Gottlieb recent acquisitions.
Remarks:
Six color etching, aquatint, and drypoint on Somerset Satin paper, 2001
Accession Number:
10.14.2

Not currently on display


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